House Rules: Nation Building

As the Kingdom Building rules in Ultimate Campaign, except for the changes described below.

Terminology


Alignment: A nation’s alignment affects its statistics, so choose your nation’s alignment carefully. Lawful nations gain a +2 bonus on Economy checks. Chaotic nations gain a +2 bonus on Loyalty checks. Good nations gain a +2 bonus on Loyalty checks. Evil nations gain a +2 bonus on Economy checks. Neutral nations gain a +2 bonus on Stability checks (a truly neutral nation gains this bonus twice).

Build Points: Build points (or BP for short) are the measure of your nation’s resources—equipment, labor, money, and so on. They’re used to acquire new hexes and develop additional buildings, settlements, and terrain improvements. Your nation also consumes BP to maintain itself (see Consumption). In general, 1 BP is worth approximately 4,000 gp; use this value to get a sense of how costly various kingdom expenditures are.
    If you’re running a small, self-starting nation, you may turn your gold into BP at a better rate. You may only take advantage of this if you don’t have a sponsor; it represents your people seeing the hard work you’re directly putting in and being inspired to do the same to get the kingdom off the ground. This improved rate depends on the Size of your nation, as shown in the following table.
Nation Size Price of 1 BP Withdrawal Rate
01–25 1,000 gp 500 gp
26–50 2,000 gp 1,000 gp
51–100 3,000 gp 1,500 gp
101+ 4,000 gp 2,000 gp

Consumption: As a nation grows, it requires more resources to provide for its people and maintain its infrastructure. Consumption represents this cost on a monthly basis, paid for with BP If a nation is unable to pay its Consumption, its Unrest increases by 2. A nation’s Consumption is equal to its size plus the number of districts of all of your settlements plus adjustments for Edicts minus 2 per farmland or fishery.

Control DC: A nation's Control DC indicates how difficult it is for its leaders to accomplish their actions. The base Control DC is equal to 20 plus the nation’s Size in hexes plus the number of districts of all your settlements plus any other modifiers from special circumstances or effects. Unless otherwise stated, the DC of a leadership check is the Control DC.

Demographics: Demographics provides several statistics regarding your nation's population.

Economy: This attribute measures the productivity of your nation's workers and the vibrancy of its trade, both in terms of money and in terms of information, innovation, and technology. Your nation's initial Economy is 0 plus your nation's alignment.

Leadership Check: Many nation actions and events require one of the nation's leaders to perform a Leadership check. A Leadership check is a d20 roll plus the leader's highest attribute modifier associated to their position (ex: Charisma for Ruler). Depending on the action or event, add your nation's Economy, Loyalty, or Stability attribute to the check. You cannot take 10 or take 20 on a nation check. Leadership checks automatically fail on a natural 1 and automatically succeed on a natural 20. Subtract your nation's Unrest from your Leadership check as a penalty.

Loyalty: Loyalty refers to the sense of goodwill among your people, their ability to live peaceably together even in times of crisis, and to fight for one another when needed. Your nation's initial Loyalty is 0 plus your nation's alignment.

Size: Count the number of hexes your nation comprises and record that number here. This number affects a nation's Consumption and its Control DC.

Stability: Stability refers to the physical and social well-being of the nation, from the health and security of its citizenry to the vitality of its natural resources and its ability to maximize their use. Your nation's initial Stability is 0 plus your nation's alignment.

Treasury: The Treasury is the amount of BP your nation has saved and can spend on activities (much in the same way that your character has gold and other valuables you can spend on gear). Your Treasury can fall below 0 (meaning your nation's costs exceed its savings and it is operating in debt), but this increases Unrest (see Upkeep Phase).

Turn: A nation turn spans 1 month of game time. You make your nation checks and other decisions about running your nation at the end of each month.

Unrest: Your nation's Unrest indicates how much discontent your citizens are feeling per nation turn. Your nation's initial Unrest is 0. Unrest can never fall below 0 (anything that would modify it to less than 0 is wasted). Subtract your kingdom's Unrest from all Leadership checks.

Nation Turn Sequence


Upkeep Phase

  1. Complete Building Construction and Hex Preparation—Reduce remaining construction time of all buildings and hex preparation time by 1 month. If 0 months remain, then that building is completed or the hex is prepared for a new settlement.
  2. Update Unrest—Add up all of the Unrest generated by your nation's buildings and add it to your current Unrest total. Increase Unrest by 1 for each kingdom attribute (Economy, Loyalty, or Stability) that is a negative number.
  3. Determine Nation Stability—Attempt a Stability check. If you fail by 4 or less, your nation loses control of one hex of your choosing; if you fail by 5 or more, your nation loses control of 1d4+1 hexes of your choosing.
  4. Pay Consumption—Subtract your nation's Consumption from the nation's Treasury. If your Treasury is negative after paying Consumption, Unrest increases by 2.
  5. Fill Vacant Magic Item Slots—If any of your settlements have buildings that produce magic items (such as a Caster's Tower or Herbalist) with vacant magic item slots, there is a chance of those slots filling with new items (see the Magic Items in Settlements section).
  6. Assign Leadership—Assign PCs or NPCs to any vacant leadership roles or change the roles being filled by particular PCs or closely allied NPCs (see Leadership Roles).

Income Phase

  1. Collect Taxes—To receive the taxes of your nation, the treasurer makes an Economy check. The amount of BP received is the percentage of your check set in your nation's taxation edict.
  2. Makes Deposits To Treasury—You can add funds to a nation's Treasury by donating your personal wealth to the nation — coins, gems, jewelry, weapons, armor, magic items, and other valuables you find while adventuring, as long as they are individually worth 4,000 gp or less. For every full 4,000 gp in value of the deposit, increase your nation's BP by 1.
    • If you want to donate an item that is worth more than 4,000 gp, refer to the next step instead.
  3. Sell Expensive Items for BP—You can attempt to sell expensive personal items (that is, items worth more than 4,000 gp each) through your nation's markets to add to your Treasury. You may sell one item per settlement district per turn. You must choose the settlement where you want to sell the item, and the item cannot be worth more than the base value of that settlement.
    • To sell an item, divide its price by half (as if selling it to an NPC for gp), divide the result by 4,000 (rounded down), and add that many BP to your Treasury.
    • You cannot use this step to sell magic items held or created by buildings in your settlements; those items are the property of the owners of those businesses. (See Magic Items in Settlements for more information on this topic.)

Decision Phase

  1. Perform Leadership Actions—Nation leaders can perform their leadership actions. Each leader can perform one action per turn in an order determined by the nation's ruler. On their turn, the nation leader can take an amount of BP from the nation's Treasury to fund their action. The phase ends until all leaders are finished performing their actions or no BP remains in the Treasury.
  2. Reduce Duration of Decision-Based Modifiers—The duration of nation-wide modifiers due to leadership actions made during the Decision Phase in months previous to this one is reduced by one month.

Event Phase

In the Event phase, a random event may affect your kingdom as a whole or a single settlement or hex.
    There is a 25% chance of an event occurring (see Events). If no event occurred during the last turn, this chance increases to 75%. Some events can be negated, ended, or compensated for with some kind of kingdom check. Others, such as a rampaging monster, require you to complete an adventure or deal with a problem in a way not covered by the kingdom-building rules.
    In addition, the GM may have an adventure- or campaign-specific event take place. Other events may also happen during this phase, such as independence or unification.

Edicts


Appointment Edicts

Appointment edicts are the different ways the nation's Ruler gains their position.

  • Acclaim: The ruler gains her position by the approval of the majority of eligible citizens within the nation.
  • Hereditary: The ruler gains her position by having it passed down to her by its previous holder through a system of inheritance.
  • Trial: The ruler gains her position by succeeding at some form of test.

Diplomatic Edicts

Diplomatic edicts are special edicts that allow you to establish an embassy, treaty, or alliance with another kingdom. Your Grand Diplomat must be present in the other nation to make this edict (though the GM may allow magical communication to handle most of the edict's details and bypass this requirement). Using this edict costs 1d4 BP in travel and other expenses.
    Your Grand Diplomat must attempt a Diplomacy check. The DC is determined using the following formula:

DC = 10 + your nation's Infamy + the target nation's special Size modifier + your nation's special Size modifier + alignment difference modifier + relationship modifier + the target nation's attitude – your nation's Fame – BP you spend on bribes or gifts

Special Size Modifier: This is equal to the nation's Size divided by 5.

Alignment Difference Modifier: This is based on how close your nation's alignment is to the target nation's alignment, according to the following table.

Table: Diplomatic Alignment Difference Modifier

Alignment Difference1 DC Modifier
Same +0
1 step +5
2 steps +15
1 Per alignment axis.

Relationship Modifier: This takes into account your treaties, alliances, and conflicts with the target nation's allies and enemies. If you are friendly with the same nations, the target is more interested in diplomacy with you. If you are friendly with the target nation's enemies, the target is less interested in negotiating with you. Modify the DC as follows for each third party you have in common.

Table: Diplomatic Relationship Modifier

Relationship DC Modifier
You and the target nation both have an alliance with a third party –8
You have a treaty with the target nation's ally –4
You and the target nation both have a treaty with a third party –2
You have an embassy with the target nation's enemy +2
You have a treaty with the target nation's enemy +5
You have an alliance with the target nation's enemy +10

Attitude: Much like the starting attitude of an NPC, the target nation's initial attitude toward you is indifferent, though the GM may modify this based on alignment differences, your shared history, culture, warfare, espionage, racial tensions, and other factors in the campaign world. These factors may also influence the Diplomacy DC for using this edict (generally increasing the DC by 5 for every attitude step worse than helpful).
    The act of making this Diplomacy check takes place over several days, with the emissary socializing with representatives of the target nation, discussing common interests and the benefits and goals of entering a diplomatic agreement with your kingdom. Because this check is not a singular event, abilities and spells that modify a single roll have no effect on this check unless they last at least 24 hours (for example, glibness does not affect this check).

Type of Diplomatic Relationships
You use Diplomatic edicts to establish an embassy, treaty, or alliance; each is a closer relation than the previous one.

Embassy: You attempt to establish mutual recognition of authority and territory with the target nation, represented by granting dominion over embassies in each other's settlements. Attempt a Diplomacy check using the Diplomatic edict DC. If the Diplomacy check fails, the other nation rejects your diplomatic efforts and you cannot attempt to establish an embassy with it again for 1 year; if the check fails by 5 or more, your nation's Fame decreases by 1 and the other nation's attitude toward your nation worsens by 1 step.
    If you succeed at the Diplomacy check, you create an embassy agreement with the target nation; if you succeed at the check by 5 or more, the target nation's attitude toward your nation improves by 1 step and your nation's Fame increases by 1. You may purchase or build a Mansion or Noble Villa in one of the other kingdom's settlements to use as an embassy (if so, your ambassador uses it as a residence). The target nation's leaders may do the same in one of your settlements. Your embassy is considered your territory (and vice versa). Your embassy grants your nation the normal bonuses for a building of its type (they apply to your kingdom's totals but not to any specific settlement in your nation) and increases Consumption by 1, Economy by 2, and Society by 2. If the target nation builds an embassy in one of your settlements, that nation gains these bonuses.
    If you founded your nation with the support of a wealthy sponsor from another nation, your nation automatically has an embassy agreement with your sponsor's, and you can use Diplomatic edicts to establish a treaty or an alliance.
    Alternatively, your envoy may attempt to threaten rather than befriend the other nation. In this case, your envoy attempts an Intimidate check, applying your nation's Infamy as a bonus. You also gain a +1 bonus for every active army your nation has. This check's DC is the same as the Diplomatic edict DC above, except your Fame and Infamy do not modify it. You may spend BP on bribes or gifts to modify the DC. Your Infamy increases by 1 whether you succeed or fail at the check. If you succeed at the check, you create an embassy agreement with the target nation. If you fail, the target nation's attitude toward you worsens by 1 step, Infamy increases by an additional 1 and you cannot make this threat again for 1 year. If it fails by 5 or more, the nation's attitude toward you worsens by 2 steps and Infamy increases by an additional 1; if the nation's attitude becomes or is already hostile, it declares war on you.
    An embassy is considered a permanent agreement. Replacing your ambassador does not affect the edict or the embassy. If you want to close your embassy and break the embassy agreement, attempt a Loyalty check. Success means you close the embassy. Failure means your citizens reject the idea of severing ties with the other nation and continue to staff the embassy; you may try again next turn.
    If you attack a nation with which you have an embassy, attempt a Loyalty check. If you succeed, your Infamy increases by 1. If you fail, Infamy and Unrest both increase by 1.

Treaty: If you have an embassy agreement with another nation, you can approach that nation's leaders to establish a treaty that formalizes your economic and social cooperation and understanding. Doing so requires a new Diplomatic edict and requires your envoy to attempt three Diplomacy checks using the Diplomatic edict DC. These checks must be attempted in order (as an extreme success or failure can change the target nation's attitude and the difficulty of the later checks). If two or more of the checks fail, the attempt to create a treaty fails; your nation's Fame decreases by 1 and you cannot attempt to establish a treaty with the other kingdom for 1 year.
    If two or more of the checks succeed, your envoy and one of the target nation's leaders (typically the Ruler or Grand Diplomat) attempt opposed checks with the following skills, rerolling ties: Bluff, Diplomacy, Knowledge (local), Knowledge (nobility), and Sense Motive. Either or both parties may substitute Intimidate for Diplomacy (even if this means one party is making a Diplomacy check opposed by the other's Intimidate check). As with Diplomatic edicts, abilities or spells that modify skill checks do not apply unless they last at least 24 hours. Whichever party wins most of these opposed checks has the advantage in the negotiations and decides whether the treaty is balanced or unbalanced.
    For a balanced treaty, increase each nation's Economy by 10% of the other country's Economy. The Fame of the party with the advantage in the negotiations by 1.
    For an unbalanced treaty, the advantaged nation's Economy increases by 15% of the disadvantaged kingdom's Economy, and the disadvantaged nation's Economy increases by 5% of the advantaged kingdom's Economy. The advantaged nation's Infamy increases by 1. You may use a Diplomatic edict to change an unbalanced treaty in your favor to a balanced treaty; doing so does not require a check.
    If one nation is an NPC nation and the GM doesn't want to calculate its exact Economy modifier, estimate its Economy as 2d6 + its Size.
    A treaty is considered a permanent agreement. If you want to renegotiate it, attempt a Loyalty check. If you succeed, your envoy and one of the target nation's leaders attempt opposed checks as described for embassies above (this doesn't guarantee you end up with a more favorable treaty). If you fail, the existing treaty remains in effect and your Unrest increases by 1.
    If you withdraw from the treaty, attempt a Loyalty check. Success means Unrest increases by 1; failure means Unrest increases by 2.
    If you attack a nation with which you have a treaty, attempt a Loyalty check. If you succeed, Infamy and Unrest increase by 1d2 each. If you fail, Infamy and Unrest increase by 1d4 each.

Alliance: If you have a treaty with another nation, you can use a Diplomatic edict to form an alliance—a military agreement of mutual defense and support. This works like the negotiations for a treaty, except it requires six Diplomacy or Intimidate checks. Four of these must succeed for the alliance to form.
    If successful, negotiations proceed as for a treaty, with three opposed Diplomacy or Intimidate checks to determine who has the advantage in negotiations. The party with the advantage may decide whether the alliance is balanced or unbalanced, but the bonuses apply to each nation's Stability instead of Economy.
    Nations in an alliance can move their armies through each others' territories and station them in each others' territories or in unoccupied Forts and Watchtowers, though not inside allied settlements. If an allied nation stations an army inside your territory, you must succeed at a Loyalty check or gain 1d2 Unrest; this does not apply if your nation has been attacked and you have requested aid from the ally.
    If you are attacked by another nation, you can call for aid from your allies. Failure to send aid increases an ally's Infamy by 1d4; the precise nature and amount of aid sent is at the discretion of the rulers of each nation, and the GM decides whether this Infamy increase happens.
    If you attack a nation with which you have an alliance, attempt a Loyalty check. If you succeed, Infamy and Unrest increase by 1d4 each. If you fail, Infamy and Unrest increase by 2d4 each. An attacked ally may end an alliance, treaty, or embassy agreement with the aggressor without penalty.

Espionage Edicts

Espionage edicts are missions undertaken by the nation's Spymaster to uncover confidential information about other nations and their leaders, or factions and power groups within them (including religious groups, noble houses, merchant consortiums, or other organizations), and sometimes to use that information aggressively to foment unrest and spread sedition within that nation.
    The target DC for an Espionage edict and the Spymaster's leadership check is impacted by the Corruption, Law, Lore, and Society modifiers in the settlement or nation being investigated. Add the Corruption, Lore, and Society modifiers to your check, and the Law modifier to the DC.

Check: The success of an Espionage edict is determined by Economy, Loyalty, and Stability checks. If all three checks are successful, the mission is a great success and your nation's gains two pieces of information from the category below, or their espionage's effects are doubled. If two checks are successful, the mission meets its objectives, acquiring the desired piece of information or having the desired effect. If only one check succeeds, the mission fails. If all three checks fail, the mission fails and your spies are caught (see Risk). In addition, if any check results in a natural 1, your spies are caught even if the mission succeeds.

Missions:

  • Gather Public Information (DC -5; 1 BP): Obtain a list of all buildings in one settlement; the location and size of all settlements in the target nation; the target nation’s size, borders, and major landforms and bodies of water (any terrainthat occupies three or more contiguous hexes); the names of the target kingdom’s leaders.
  • Discover Minor Secrets (DC +0; 2 BP): Obtain a list of Embassies, Treaties, and Allies of a kingdom; a list of Trade Routes (type and destination) in that nation; the Settlement Alignment, Government, Qualities, Statistics, and Disadvantages of a settlement; the location of terrain improvements, Landmarks, and Special Resources in the target nation; the level of Unrest in the target kingdom; or uncover minor trade secrets that grant your kingdom a +1d2 bonus to Economy for 1d4 months (doubled if you have a Treaty or Trade Route with the target nation).
  • Discover Major Secrets (DC +10; 3 BP): Obtain a list of armies located in a city; discover the attitude of the nation toward other countries; discover the character classes of the target nation’s leaders; discover the target nation’s current Economy, Loyalty, and Stability modifiers, as well as its nation-wide Corruption, Crime, Law, Lore, Productivity, and Society modifiers; obtain significant trade secrets providing your kingdom with a +1d4 bonus to Economy for 2d4 months (doubled if you have a Treaty or Trade Route with the target nation).
  • Discover Vital Secrets (DC +20; 4 BP): Discover the class levels and alignment of kingdom leaders; discover the most valuable or powerful magic item of 1d4 nation leaders; discover the location of all of the target nation’s armies; discover secret ways into or out a fortified settlement (or a Fort or Watchtower terrain improvement), allowing your armies to ignore half of the total Defense value of that fortification; obtain major trade secrets granting your nation a +2d4 bonus to Economy for 2d6 months (doubled if you have a Treaty or Trade Route with the target kingdom).
  • Bribe Mercenaries (DC +0 to demoralize, DC +5 for desertion, +10 for treason; these DC modifiers are doubled if your nation is at war with the mercenaries’ present employer): The target mercenary army loses 1d3 points of Morale (sap morale), deserts their present employer and flees (desertion), or switches sides to join your armies (treason). Using this type of Espionage Edict requires a cash bribe of 1 BP times the army’s AR.
  • Foment Unrest (DC +5; 2 BP): Your spies add 1d3 Unrest in the target nation.
  • Organize Crime Spree (DC +5; 1 BP): Your agents reduce Economy by 1 and increase Crime by 1 in the target nation, which also loses 1d6 BP from its Treasury.
  • Sabotage Building or Improvement (DC +5 for Terrain Improvement, +10 for building in a village, +15 in a town, +20 in a city or metropolis; 2 BP): Your saboteurs damage one building or terrain improvement, rendering it nonfunctional until repaired at half the building cost. If you achieve complete success with three successful checks for this Espionage Edict, you may choose to damage two improvements or buildings or completely destroy one. This has no effect on buildings that provide a Defense bonus.
  • Spread Rumor and Scandal (DC +5; 1 BP): Your agents start a whispering campaign that breeds mistrust and gossip, reducing Loyalty and Society by 1 and also decreasing the target nation’s Fame or increasing its Infamy by 1.

Risks: If your spies are caught, your nation must succeed at a Loyalty check, which is adjusted by all modifiers listed above that applied to the Espionage Edict you attempted.
    If the Loyalty check succeeds, your spy is imprisoned or executed but does not reveal your involvement. If the Loyalty check fails, the spy breaks under questioning and tells who sent him and why. This revelation increases your nation’s Corruption and Infamy by 1, decreases your Loyalty by 1, and causes you to gain 1 point of Unrest. In addition, the target nation (or other similar group) has its attitude towards you shifted by one step in a negative direction for 1 year. Likewise, citizens of the target nation have their attitude shifted towards any PC or NPC affiliated with the government of your nation adjusted negatively by one step.
    If the target nation is one with whom you have an Embassy, Treaty, or Alliance, the above modifiers are doubled and you lose 1d4 points of Fame and must make one Loyalty check each for your Embassy, Treaty, and Alliance. Each failed check causes your nation to lose 1 additional point of Fame and cancels your highest Diplomatic Edict with that country. Hence, if you are caught spying upon a country with whom you have an Alliance, one failed check reduces your relationship to a Treaty, two failed checks to an Embassy, and three failed checks causes that nation to sever all diplomatic relations with your nation).

Expansion Edicts

Expansion edicts dictate how strongly you promote the growth of your nation. This includes events and actions used to attract new citizens and increase the well-being of the kingdom, such as recruitment campaigns, advertisements about services and goods, and propaganda to improve the perception of your kingdom at home and abroad. Expansion edicts also dictates your nation's growth policy, and arranges the flow of resources to suit it. This allows you to increase the nation's expansion limits towards claiming hexes, founding new settlements, and building new improvements and buildings.
    Your nation's size dictates the limit of new hexes you can claim or how much you can build every nation turn. Essentially, this is how much efforts and resources your nation has that can be diverted to these endeavours. You can claim hexes, found new settlements, and build new improvements and buildings beyond the expansion limit, but each time you do so increases the BP cost by 1 each time for each type, representing how much resources you must garner from outside sources at higher costs. However, to encourage growth, the Expansion Limit for new buildings is considered 1 higher for one House or Tenement.
    For example, if your Expansion Edict is set to Standard and your nation size is less than 10, your building expansion limit is 1. If you order 2 buildings in the same month, you must pay 1 extra BP. However, if one of those buildings is a House or Tenement, then there is no extra cost. A third building in the same month with a House/Tenement then increases the total cost by +1 BP, as opposed to +3 BP if no Houses/Tenements were ordered.

Table: Expansion Edicts

Attitude Expansion Limits Economy Loyalty Stability Consumption
Isolationist -2 -2 +2 +2 -4
Cautious -1 -1 -1 +1 -2
Standard +0 +0 +0 +0 +0
Aggressive +1 +1 -1 -1 +2
Imperialist +2 +2 -2 -2 +4

Table: Expansion Limits

Nation Size Hex Claims New Settlements New Buildings Terrain Improvements
01—10 1 1 1 2
11—25 2 1 2 3
26—50 3 1 5 5
51—100 4 2 10 7
101—200 8 3 20 10
201—300 12 4 30 13
(+100) (+4) (+1) (+10) (+3)

Festival Edicts

Festival edicts are different from holiday edicts in that they are one-time events, localized in a specific area or settlement. They are grand celebrations for a military victory, a tournament to host visiting dignitaries, a festival to celebrate the marriage of a nation leader, and other impromptu special events. Festival edicts are normally held in a settlement, bringing in increased business and prosperity, but can also be held in a hex with a Landmark. Festivals may be either civic or religious in nature.

Cost: Festivals require a great deal of resources to pull off, and how much depends on where they are being held. See Table: Festival Costs.

Table: Festival Costs

Location BP Cost
Landmark 1d2
Thorp 1d2
Hamlet 1d3
Village 1d3+1
Small Town 1d4+1
Large Town 1d6+1
Small City 2d4+1
Large City 3d4
Metropolis 2d6+2
(+1) (+1d6+1)

Benefit: A festival celebrated at a Landmark in the countryside increases the Landmark’s bonus to Loyalty by +1 for 1 year. Festivals celebrated in a settlement have the following effects, depending if they are civic or religious in nature.

Civic Festival: A civic festival celebrates local traditions, events, heroes, or culture, including athletic and artistic competitions.
    Requires: Tavern (thorpe, hamlet, village), Theater (small or large town), Arena (small or large city, metropolis), or Landmark (located in the same hex as the settlement).
    Effect: For one month, your kingdom gains a +2 bonus to Crime and Society, and the civic festival increases the effects (see below) of Arenas, Black Markets, Bordellos, Dance Halls, Gambling Dens, Inns, Luxury Shops, Markets, Monuments, Palaces, Parks, Shops, and Taverns in that city.

Religious Festival: A religious festival produces an outpouring of piety and pilgrimage, sometimes marked with great solemnity and other times with great rejoicing.
    Requires: Shrine (thorpe, hamlet, village), Temple (small or large town), Cathedral (small or large city, metropolis), or Landmark (located in the same hex as the settlement).
    Effect: For one month, your kingdom gains a +2 bonus to Law and Society, and the religious festival increases the effects of Cathedrals, Graveyards, Inns, Luxury Shops, Markets, Monuments, Parks, Shops, Shrines, and Temples in that settlement are increased (see Risks).

Determining Success: When you issue a Festival Edict, make Economy, Loyalty, and Stability checks. If all three succeed, the Festival is a resounding success, doubling the effects of the buildings listed above; in addition, you gain the benefits of an Outstanding Success (01-50), Visiting Celebrity (51-95), or both (96-00) kingdom events.
    If two checks succeed, the Festival is a modest success, increasing the effects of the listed buildings by 50% for one month. Total the bonuses for all listed buildings in the settlement together before applying the 50% increase, rounding down; do not apply the 50% increase separately to each building.
    When buildings effects are increased (whether doubled or by 50%), this increase includes not only nation and settlement attribute modifiers like Economy and Lore; it also includes a doubling of Base Value and magic item creation during that month. This increase allows a settlement to exceed the normal maximum Base Value for a settlement of its size (either doubling or increasing it by 50%, as appropriate) for that month. It likewise creates temporary magic item slots that are filled immediately and can be used just like any other magic item slots in the kingdom. However, any magic items created in this fashion are available only during the month of the Festival Edict and the items and their slots disappear when the festival ends, being taken home by the crafters and merchants who brought them to the festival.
    If only one check or no checks succeed, see Risks below.

Risks: Regardless of the overall success of the festival, the great influx of people and mercantile traffic involved creates the potential for enemy infiltration in the guise of pilgrims and festival-goers, or discord and strife between foreigners and locals or different groups coming together in one place, or just general drunkenness and mayhem should celebrants get out of control and overwhelm the ability of the settlement or the nation’s ability to handle so many people in such a small space.
    During any month when a Festival Edict is issued, the entire nation takes a -2 Stability penalty, and any Stability checks required for the settlement or hex where the Festival is held take a -4 penalty (this does not apply to the Stability check to determine the success of the festival, but it does apply to any nation events triggered by the festival).

Unsuccessful Festivals: If only one check succeeds, the Festival is unsuccessful and grants no benefits; in addition, there is a 50% chance that disgruntled citizens issue a Building Demand (as the kingdom event), blaming the lack of success on the absence (or presence, if they demand demolition) of that building.
    If all three checks fail, the Festival is a disaster, providing no benefits. The kingdom loses 1 point of Fame and gains 1d4-1 points of Unrest, and disaffected locals bankrupted by the festival and lingering troublemakers in the wake of the festival become Squatters (01-50), Vandals (51-95), or both (96-00), triggering nation events of the appropriate type.

Natural 1: A natural 1 is always a failure on any nation roll, and each time you roll a natural 1 on any of the three nation checks to determine the success of the Festival Edict there is a 25% non-cumulative chance of triggering a dangerous settlement event. This event may be of any type, but only one such event can be triggered, even if you roll more than one natural 1.

Holiday Edicts

Holiday edicts are general celebrations or observances that take place across the nation. The BP expenditure includes lost revenue from citizens not working during the holidays, preparations and logistical arrangements that occur year-round, and the cost of the actual celebrations (these annual costs are averaged over the year and included in the listed Consumption modifier that you pay each turn).
    The number of holidays per year is the number you promise to uphold and the number that the common folk expect to enjoy over the next months. The Loyalty and Consumption modifiers change as soon as you change the number of holidays per year. The listed number assumes that you are fulfilling your promise—if you announce 12 holidays in the coming year but don't actually hold and pay for them, the GM should increase your kingdom's Unrest to reflect public disappointment and outrage.

Table: Holiday Edicts

Edicts Per Year Economy Loyalty Consumption
None -2 –4 +0
Annually -1 -2 +1
Quarterly +0 +0 +2
Monthly +1 +2 +4
Weekly +2 +4 +8

Military Edicts

Military edicts dictate your nation's commitment to militarism, whether for aggression or defence. They determine how much of your population you can recruit into your armies without putting too much strain on your society and economy. They also define your nation's attitude towards military endeavours and the face it presents to the world.

Table: Military Edicts

Militarism Manpower Elites Fame/Infamy Defense Economy Society
Pacifist 1% 0% +2 Fame -1 +2 +2
Peaceful 5% 0% +1 Fame +1 +1
Normal 10% 1%
Aggressive 15% 3% +1 Infamy -1 -1
Warmonger 20% 5% +2 Infamy +1 -2 -2

Manpower: This represents the percentage of the population that can be recruited as regular army soldiers (1st-level fighters) and the same number that can be recruited as ordinary militia (1st-level warriors). Any armies that you recruit beyond this limit are treated as emergency conscripts (1st-level commoners that automatically gain the shaken condition in combat).
    In addition to representing the total available soldiers of each type, manpower represents the percentage of your population that you can keep under arms on an ongoing basis without impacting your nation’s morale. A nation can keep a percentage of its citizens, including all units belonging to all armies (army, elites, militia, and conscripts combined), of up to its manpower. For every percentage point above its manpower limit, it takes a -1 penalty to Loyalty checks.
    If you decrease your militarism level to a level where the standing armies you have in the field exceed your allowed manpower, you must split, reform, or disband those standing armies to conform to your new militarism level. If you do not do this, your kingdom gains 1 point of Unrest for every percentage point by which you exceed your manpower percentage, and each army over the limit loses 1 point of Morale by the same amount.

Elites: This percentage functions like manpower, but represents the total number of your population that can be recruited as 3rd-level warriors or 2nd-level PC classes. Unlike manpower, you cannot exceed this percentage; these additional elites simply do not exist among your population to be recruited.
    Higher-level elites can also be recruited, though this reduces the pool of available elite soldiers.

Table: Higher-level Elites

Level Replaces Required Nation Size
3rd 2 Normal Elites 11 Hexes
4th 3 Normal Elites 26 Hexes
5th 5 Normal Elites 51 Hexes
6th 8 Normal Elites 101 Hexes
7th 12 Normal Elites 201 Hexes

Building Requirements: Recruiting elite soldiers must be done in a settlement, not a Fort, and requires one or more additional buildings to be present in that settlement, in addition to a Barracks, Castle, or Garrison.

Table: Elite Soldier Building Requirements

Class Building Class Building Class Building Class Building
Aegis Arcanist Magical Academy and Military Academy Alchemist Alchemist Archivist Bardic College or Library
Ardent Artificer Barbarian Arena Bard Bardic College
Beguiler Binder Bloodrager Arena and Caster's Tower Brawler Arena
Cavalier Military Academy and either Noble Villa or Stables Cleric Cathedral or Temple Cryptic Crusader
Divine Mind Dragon Shaman Dragonfire Adept Dread
Dread Necromancer Druid Sacred Grove Duskblade Caster's Tower and Military Academy Erudite
Factotum Favored Soul Fighter Military Academy Gunslinger Exotic Artisan and Military Academy
Harbinger Healer Hospital Hexblade Hunter
Incarnate Inquisitor Temple and either Courthouse or Town Hall Investigator Police Station Kineticist
Knight Noble Villa and Stables Lurk Magewright Magus Magical Academy and Military Academy
Mahokage Black Market and Caster's Tower Marksman Marshal Medium
Mesmerist Monk Monastery Mystic Ninja Black Market and Military Academy
Occultist Oracle Paladin Military Academy and either Cathedral or Temple; nation alignment LG or NG Psion
Psychic Magical Academy Psychic Warrior Magical Academy and Military Academy Ranger Menagerie and Military Academy Rogue Black Market or Gambling Den
Samurai Military Academy and Noble Villa Scout Military Academy Shadowcaster Shaman
Shugenja Skald Bardic College Sohei Sorcerer Caster's Tower and Military Academy
Soulborn Soulknife Spellthief Caster's Tower and either Black Market or Gambler's Den Spirit Shaman
Spiritualist Stalker Summoner Caster's Tower and Military Academy Swashbuckler
Swordsage Tactician Totemist Truenamer Magical Academy
Vigilante Black Market and Military Academy Vitalist Warblade Warder
Warlock Caster's Tower Warlord Warmage Magical Academy and Military Academy Warpriest Military Academy and Temple
Wilder Witch Caster's Tower Wizard Magical Academy Wu Jen
Zealot

Mercenaries: In addition to conscripting its own citizens, a nation can hire mercenaries, which do not count against its Manpower limit (see below). However, the nation takes a -1 penalty to Loyalty for each mercenary army the nation employs. This penalty disappears when a mercenary army is destroyed or released from service. If a mercenary army is induced to desert or betray your nation by an enemy Spymaster's action, your kingdom gains 1 Unrest.

Fame/Infamy: Nations known to be aggressive in building their military gain Infamy while peaceful nations gain Fame. This modifier is based on a nation’s current level of militarism and changes whenever militarism does.

Defense: The greater military readiness of a highly militarized nation increases the Defense bonus of any fortifications in the nation by 1, while the less vigorous vigilance of pacifist nations decreases the Defense bonus of any fortifications by 1. This adjustment applies to the total Defense bonus of a settlement, Fort, or Watchtower, not to individual buildings that combine to provide a settlement’s Defense bonus.

Economy: Peaceful nations are able to devote their efforts toward business and prosperity rather than preparations for war, creating a more robust and diverse economy than highly militarized nations.

Society: Peaceful nations are generally more friendly, tolerant, and open to outsiders than militarized nations, while aggressive nations are less apt to trust foreigners and usually see them as potential threats.

Religious Edicts

Religious edicts dictate how religions are treated in your nation.

  • Banned religion: Specific religion cannot be practiced in your nation. Infamy with specific religion increased by 2.
  • Free religion: All religions can legally be practiced in your nation.
  • No religion: No religions can be legally practiced in your nation. Infamy with all religions increased by 2.
  • State religion: Specific religion gains special rights and privileges within your nation. Fame with specific religion increased by 2.

Rulership Edicts

Rulership edicts determines how the ruling power the nation is distributed.

  • Autocrat: The Ruler has all of the nation's authority and power. Example: an emperor, a king. Modifiers: none.
  • Committee: The nation's ruling power is shared equally among a small group of people, usually a close group of allies. Example: a small council, an inner circle. Modifiers: Loyalty +2, Stability +2.
  • Assembly: Although the nation has one Ruler, their authority is checked by a large group of citizens selected to help shape the laws and policies of the nation. The Ruler must convince members of this group to support any action he wishes to execute, otherwise the groups influence and support will prevent the Ruler's action from happening. Example: a senate, a parliament. Modifiers: +1 per 5 persons in the assembly to Economy, Loyalty, and Stability.

Social Edicts

  • Free Speech: Loyalty +1, Stability -1; Lore +1, Society +1.
  • Legalize Slavery: Economy +2, Loyalty -2; Corruption +2, Society -2; Infamy +2; all buildings and improvements cost half BP, buildings already discounted by other buildings cost one quarter BP.
  • Ban Slavery: Loyalty +1; Society +1; Fame +1.
  • Legalize Narcotics: Economy +2, Stability -2; Corruption +2, Society -2.
  • Class System: Your nation is divided into two or more classes of society, each with their own set of rights and privileges.

Taxation Edicts

Setting the tax level determines how much revenue you collect from taxes in the Income Phase. Higher tax level increases the percentage of your Economy check that is converted to BP and added to your treasury, but makes your citizens unhappy (reducing Loyalty) and drives away business (reducing Economy).

Table: Taxation Edicts

Taxation Level Economy Loyalty
0% +3 +1
10% +2 -1
20% +1 -2
30% +0 -4
40% -1 -8
50% -2 -16
(+10%) (-1) (x2)

Trade Edicts

Trade edicts are special edicts that allow you to create a trade route with another nation, increasing the BP you gain every month, as well as possibly increasing your Fame and other nation statistics.

To plan a trade route, select another nation as your trade partner and determine the distance in hexes from a settlement in your nation to a settlement in the target nation, tracing the path of the trade route rather than a direct line. A trade route can pass through grassland, desert, or any terrain that has a road or highway. If your settlement contains a Pier, the trade route can pass along rivers and coastal hexes. If your settlement contains a Waterfront, your trade route can pass through water hexes.

Longer trade routes are harder to maintain than short ones. To determine the effective length of your trade route, hexes with roads or rivers count normally. Grassland and desert hexes count double. Water hexes and hexes with highways count as half. This total distance is the Trade Route Length (TRL). Divide the Trade Route Length by 10 to get the Route Modifier (RM). Subtract the TRL from your nation's Size to get the Length Modifier (LM), with a minimum LM of 0.

Establishing a trade route takes 1 hex per day along Roads and Rivers (upstream), 2 along coastlines, and 4 along water or Rivers (downstream). If the journey requires 1 turn or more, you gain no benefits from it until the turn the traders arrive at their destination.

You must invest at least 5 BP into the initial trade expedition using this trade route. The first time your traders reach the destination settlement, attempt an Economy check, a Loyalty check, and a Stability check. Determine the DC as follows:

DC = Control DC + your settlement's Corruption + the RM + the LM – your settlement's Productivity

If all three checks fail, the trade route is a total loss; Fame decreases by 1 and Unrest increases by 1. If one check succeeds, the expedition fails to reach its destination but sells its goods elsewhere for 1d4 BP per every 5 BP invested.

If two checks succeed, the trade route is established; Economy increases by 1 and Treasury increases by the RM + 2d4 BP per 5 BP invested in the initial trade expedition. For example, if you invested 5 BP in a trade route with an RM of 2, Treasury increases by 2 + 2d4 BP.

If all three checks succeed, the trade route is established and is a great success; Economy increases by 2, Fame increases by 1, and Treasury increases by the RM + 2d4 BP per 5 BP invested in the initial trade expedition.

An established trade route provides its benefits for 1 year.

A nation can have one of each of the following types of trade route. Each type requires certain buildings in your settlement, and each increases the Economy bonus from a successful trade route.

Food: If your nation has surplus production from farms and fisheries that reduces its Consumption to below 0, you may export food. a successful food trade route increases Economy by 1 for every 10 Farms and Fisheries in the nation; this benefit is lost in any month that Farms and Fisheries do not reduce Consumption below 0. You must have at least 1 Granary and 1 Stockyard in your settlement.

Goods: The trade route transports goods such as weapons and textiles. Count all Guildhalls, Smithies, Shops, Trade Shops, and Tanneries in the starting settlement and divide by 10; a successful goods trade route increases Economy by this amount. You must have at least 1 Guildhall in your settlement.

Luxuries: This trade route carries exotic goods such as art, musical instruments, books, spices, dyes, and magic items. Count all Alchemists, Caster's Towers, Exotic Artisans, Herbalists, Luxury Stores, and Magic Shops in the starting settlement and divide by 10; a successful luxuries trade route increases Economy by that amount. You must have at least 1 Luxury Store in your settlement.

Raw Materials: This trade route carries common raw materials such as lumber, stone, ore, or metal. a successful raw materials trade route increases Economy by 1 for every 10 Mines, Quarries, and Sawmills in the nation. You must have at least 1 Foundry in the starting settlement to count Mines.

Vassalage Edicts

Vassalage are special edicts that allow you to cede a portion of your lands (or unclaimed lands you deem yours to take) to a subordinate leader, sponsoring that leader's rulership in exchange for fealty. You can also use a Vassalage edict to found a colony beholden to your nation. You may also use a Vassalage edict to subjugate an existing nation you have conquered without having to absorb the entire nation hex by hex. When you issue a Vassalage edict, you must select a person to take the Viceroy leadership role.

Issuing a Vassalage edict requires you to spend 1d4 BP and give additional BP to the Viceroy as a starting Treasury for the vassal nation (just as a wealthy sponsor may have granted to your initial Treasury). You may give up to 1/4 of your nation's Treasury to your new vassal as a grant to help found the nation.

When you issue a Vassalage edict, you are creating a new nation or attaching an existing nation to your own. Your vassal functions in most respects as a separate entity with its own nation scores. You decide how it is governed; you may give its leaders full autonomy, or give occasional suggestions or commands about buildings and improvements, or control it directly by giving orders to the Viceroy.

New Vassal or Colony: When you issue a Vassalage edict to create a new colony or nation, you may immediately establish an embassy, treaty, or alliance (your choice) with your new vassal (see Diplomatic edicts). You may decide that the treaty and alliance are balanced or unbalanced. These decisions are automatically successful and do not require rolls.

Subjugation: When you issue this edict to subjugate another nation, you may immediately establish an embassy, but you must follow the normal rules if you wish to establish a treaty or alliance. If you spend BP on bribes or gifts to reduce the DC and you succeed at forming the treaty or alliance, you may count half of this amount as going toward new improvements or buildings built in the vassal kingdom that turn.

The starting attitude of the vassal kingdom is based on alignment compatibility (as per Diplomatic edicts) and modified by the circumstances under which you deposed the prior leadership per GM discretion—for example, improving if you removed a hated tyrant or worsening if you unseated a popular ruler.

Subjugation may cause friction between your established citizens and the newly conquered. You must attempt a Loyalty check each turn (when you issue the edict, and on future turns during the Upkeep Phase), increasing the DC by the subjugated nation's Size divided by 5. Failure means Unrest increases by 1d4. If you succeed at this check three turns in a row, you establish a peaceful equilibrium and no longer need to attempt these checks.

Vacancy Penalty: If the vassal kingdom take a vacancy penalty for not having a Viceroy or a Viceroy not doing his duties, that nation also takes the Ruler vacancy penalty. A Consort or Heir from your nation may mitigate this penalty if she is touring the vassal state; however, she cannot also mitigate the Ruler vacancy penalty in your nation.

Leadership Roles


In order to avoid a Leadership role's vacancy penalty, the character for that particular role must spend at least 1 week per month engaged in various leadership duties (during which time the PCs must be located within a hex that is part of their nation). This time need not be consecutive. A single character can only occupy one leadership role at a time, however a leader can perform another role's leadership action at double the BP cost with a disadvantage to their leadership check.

Leadership Ability: Each leadership role gains benefit from one of two ability scores listed here. The character in this leadership role may add the highest modifier of the two abilities to his Leadership check.

Vacancy Penalty: This line explains the penalty to your kingdom if no character fills this role, or if the leader fails to spend the necessary time fulfilling his responsibilities. Some roles have no vacancy penalty. If a character in a role is killed or permanently incapacitated during a turn and not restored to health by the start of the next kingdom turn, that role counts as vacant for that next turn, after which a replacement can be appointed to the role.

Like benefits, most vacancy penalties are constant, last as long as that role is vacant, and don't stack with themselves. If a vacant role lists an increase to Unrest, however, that increase does not go away when the role is filled. For example, if the kingdom doesn't have a ruler for a turn, Unrest increases by 4 and doesn't automatically return to its previous level when you eventually fill the vacant Ruler role.

Abdicating a Role: If you want to step down from a leadership position, you must find a replacement to avoid incurring the appropriate vacancy penalty for your position. Abdicating a position increases Unrest by 1 and requires a Loyalty check; if the check fails, the vacancy penalty applies for 1 turn while the new leader transitions into that role. If you are the Ruler, abdicating increases Unrest by 2 instead of 1, and you take a –4 penalty on the Loyalty check to avoid the vacancy penalty.

If you are not the Ruler and are leaving one leadership role to take a different one in the nation, the Unrest increase does not occur and you gain a +4 bonus on the Loyalty check to avoid the vacancy penalty.

Leadership Actions: If you are in a leadership position, there are certain actions related to your position that you can do that affect your nation. Unless otherwise specified, each action can only be performed once per turn, but you may perform any number of actions so long as you have enough BP to pay for them. Unless otherwise stated, leadership actions cost 1 BP, but you may pay additional BP to gain a bonus on your leadership check equal to that additional amount. A failed check still expends the BP paid.

Leadership Check: In order to succeed your leadership action, you must succeed a leadership check. A Leadership check is 1d20 + your Leadership ability modifier. The DC of your leadership check is equal to your nation's Control DC, and each action will specify which of your nation's attributes (Economy, Loyalty, or Stability) to add to your check. If you have ranks in the Profession skill for your Leadership role (e.g. Profession (ruler) or Profession (magister)), add a +1 bonus to your check for every 5 points of your skill modifier for that Profession. If you have the Leadership feat, add a +1 bonus to your check for every 5 points of your leadership score.

Ruler

The Ruler is the highest-ranking person in the nation, above even the other nation leaders, and is expected to embody the values of the nation. The Ruler performs the nation's most important ceremonies (such as knighting royals and signing treaties), is the nation's chief diplomatic officer (though most of these duties are handled by the Grand Diplomat), is the signatory for all laws affecting the entire nation, pardons criminals when appropriate, and is responsible for appointing characters to all other high positions in the government (such as other leadership roles, mayors of settlements, and judges).
    In a campaign where the leaders are nobles or royals, marrying someone of lesser station means the spouse becomes a Consort rather than a Ruler.
    If your nation's rulership edict is set to committee, the nation may have two or more Rulers. Each Ruler may perform Rulership action independently of each other, but each of them receives a -2 penalty to their Leadership checks each Ruler in addition to the first.
    If your nation's rulership edict is set to assembly, then the DC to all your Leadership checks increases by an amount for each additional person that forms your nation's committee or assembly. The amount is based on the other persons attitude to the Ruler.

Table: Assembly Attitudes

Attitude DC Modifier
Hostile +3
Unfriendly +2
Indifferent +1
Friendly +0
Helpful -1
  • Leadership Ability: Wisdom or Charisma.
  • Vacancy Penalty: A nation without a ruler cannot claim new hexes, create farmlands, build roads, or purchase settlement improvements. Increase Unrest by 4 during each Upkeep phase in which the nation has no ruler.
  • Actions:
  • Abandon hexes (Stability): You may abandon any number of hexes to reduce your kingdom's Size (which you may wish to do to manage Consumption). Doing so increases Unrest by 1 for each hex abandoned (or by 4 if the hex contained a settlement). This otherwise functions like losing a hex due to unrest (see Step 4 of the Upkeep Phase).
    • Claim hex (Stability): For your kingdom to grow, you must claim additional hexes. You can only claim a hex that is adjacent to at least 1 other hex in your kingdom. Before you can claim it, the hex must first be explored, then cleared of monsters and dangerous hazards (see Steps 2 and 3 of Founding a Settlement for more details). Then, to claim the hex, spend 1 BP; this establishes the hex as part of your kingdom and increases your kingdom's Size by 1. You may perform this action multiple times per turn. If you claim hexes beyond your nation's expansion limit, the cost is 1 BP higher than the previous claimed hex.
    • Create settlement (Stability): You may create a settlement in a claimed hex (see Founding a Settlement). You may perform this action multiple times per turn. If you create settlements beyond your nation's expansion limit, the cost is 1 BP higher than the previously created settlement.
    • Garner support (Loyalty): You go on tours or arrange special events to meet with various members of the general population of your nation, or especially influential individuals. You speak with them to improve their morale and support for your government. A successful Leadership check gives your nation a +1d4 bonus to Loyalty until the end of your next Decision Phase. If you fail by 5 or more, your nation instead receives a -1d4 penalty to Loyalty.
    • Improve settlement (no check; no cost—use building's cost): You commission the construction of a building in one of your settlements. You may perform this action multiple times per turn. If you improve settlements beyond your nation's expansion limit, the cost for each following building increases by a number of BP equal to the number over the building expansion limit.
    • Improve terrain (no check; no cost—use improvement's cost): You commission the construction of a terrain improvement in one of your nation's hexes. You may perform this action multiple times per turn. If you improve hexes beyond your nation's expansion limit, the cost for each following improvement increases by a number of BP equal to the number over the terrain improvement expansion limit.
    • Issue edict (Loyalty; no cost—use edict's cost): Select or adjust your edict levels for any edict not covered by the other Leadership roles. (see Edicts). You can take this action only once per Decision Phase per different type of edict.
    • Other leadership actions (varies): As the nation ultimate authority, you may involve yourself in the affairs of other leadership roles, and perform actions available to them. However, each action costs 2 BP, and you receive a -5 penalty to their check.
    • Prepare hex (Stability): You prepare a claimed hex to place a settlement. You cannot choose a hex that was claimed during this Decision Phase. See the Preparation Cost column on Table: Terrain and Terrain Improvements for the BP cost.
    • Secure financial backing (Economy): You arrange for special meetings with the wealthy and influential people of your nation to convince them to invest funds and resources in government work. A successful Leadership check gives your nation a +1d4 bonus to Economy until your next Decision Phase. If you fail by 5 or more, the people are insulted by your request, and your nation instead receives a -1d4 penalty to Loyalty..

Consort

The Consort is usually the spouse of the Ruler, and spends time attending court, speaking with and advising nobles, touring the nation to lift the spirits of the people, and so on. In most nations, you cannot have two married Rulers and a Consort at the same time.
    The Consort represents the Ruler when the Ruler is occupied or otherwise unable to act. With the Ruler's permission, the Consort may perform any of the Ruler's duties, allowing the Ruler to effectively act in two places at once. If the Ruler dies, the Consort may act as Ruler until the Heir comes of age and can take over as Ruler.

  • Leadership Ability: Wisdom or Charisma.
  • Vacancy Penalty: None.
  • Actions: Same as Ruler, except you have a -4 penalty.

Councilor

The Councilor acts as a liaison between the citizenry and the other nation leaders, parsing requests from the commonwealth and presenting the leaders' proclamations to the people in understandable ways. It is the Councilor's responsibility to make sure the Ruler is making decisions that benefit the nation's communities and its citizens.

  • Leadership Ability: Wisdom or Charisma.
  • Vacancy Penalty: Loyalty decreases by 2. The kingdom gains no benefits from the Holiday edict. Unrest increases by 1.
  • Actions:
    • Calm public (Loyalty): Through public assemblies and a network of speakers, you listen to and speak with your nation's people, easing their concerns. Reduce Unrest by 1.
    • Issue festival edict (see Festival Edicts; no cost—use festival cost): You issue a festival edict. You can take this action only once per Decision Phase.
    • Issue holiday edict (see Holiday Edicts): You issue or adjust your holiday edict levels. You can take this action only once per Decision Phase.
    • Issue social edict (see Social Edicts): You issue or adjust your nation's social edicts. You can take this action only once per Decision Phase.

Enforcer

The Enforcer deals with punishing criminals, working with the Councilor to make sure the citizens feel the government is adequately dealing with wrongdoers, and working with the Marshal to capture fugitives from the law. The Enforcer may grant civilians the authority to kill in the name of the law.

  • Leadership Ability: Strength or Dexterity.
  • Vacancy Penalty: None.
  • Actions:
    • Reduce Strife (Loyalty): You make a few discreet encounters with vocal dissidents in the middle of the night, or make several notable public appearance to remind the population the ultimate penalty. A successful check reduces 1d4 Unrest. If you fail by 5 or more, your nation's Unrest increases by 1d4.
    • Assassination (Stability): Using subtlety or brute force, you assassinate your target. Select an NPC as your target, and add his CR to the Leadership DC. A successful check results in the target being killed. If you fail by 4 or less, your nation's Unrest increases by 1d4, and the target survives but does not know who is behind the attack. If you fail by 5 or more, your nation's Unrest increases by 2d4, and the target survives and knows who is behind the attack.

General

The General is the highest-ranking member of the nation's military. If the nation has an army and a navy, the heads of those organizations report to the nation's General. The General is responsible for looking after the needs of the military and directing the nation's armies in times of war. Most citizens see the General as a protector and patriot. The General makes all nation checks for the nation's armies (see Mass Combat)

  • Leadership Ability: Strength or Charisma.
  • Vacancy Penalty: Loyalty decreases by 4.
  • Actions:
    • Adjust military edicts (no check; no cost): You adjust your nation's Military Edicts. You can take this action only once per Decision Phase. See Military Edicts.
    • Equip army (Economy; use army resource cost): You purchase a resource for an army unit. The unit must be in reserve. The unit will acquire the resource at the start of your next Decision Phase.
    • Raise morale (Loyalty): You tour one of your nation's armies, speaking with the soldiers and raising their morale. Select one of your nation's armies. If you succeed your check, you increase that army's morale by 1. An army can increase its morale by this action only once per Decision Phase.
    • Recruit army unit (Loyalty; use army's cost): You create an army unit at a chosen settlement as long as that settlement has enough military buildings to reserve a unit of that size, and as long as you have the BP to pay for the unit's creation. If you add an army resource to the newly created unit, the settlement must have the required buildings for that resource. A newly created army unit begins at 1st level.
    • Train army unit (Loyalty; cost variable—see description): You put one of your army units through an intense training regimen to improve their skills. You can increase a unit's level by 1 only once per Decision Phase. While training, your unit must be in reserve and cannot take any other action. Training a unit costs BP equal to the unit's current UCR + 1 (minimum 1 BP). Add the unit's current UCR to the Control DC. Your unit's training will require a number of months equal half of its new UCR (minimum 1 month).

Grand Diplomat

The Grand Diplomat is in charge of the nation's foreign policy—how it interacts with other nations and similar political organizations such as tribes of intelligent monsters. The Grand Diplomat is the head of all of the nation's diplomats, envoys, and ambassadors. It is the Grand Diplomat's responsibility to represent and protect the interests of the nation with regard to foreign powers.

  • Leadership Ability: Intelligence or Charisma.
  • Vacancy Penalty: Stability decreases by 2. The kingdom cannot issue Diplomatic or Exploration edicts.
  • Actions:
    • Improve foreign relations (Stability): You begin a dialog with representatives of another nation to forge better relations with them. Select another nation.
    • Issue diplomatic edicts (see Diplomatic Edicts): You issue or adjust your diplomatic edicts. You can take this action only once per Decision Phase.

Heir

The Heir is the person next in line to become Ruler. The Heir's time is mostly spent learning to become a ruler—pursuing academic and martial training, touring the nation to get to the know the land and its people, experiencing the intrigues of courtly life, and so on.
    Because the Heir carries the potential of being the next Ruler, the Heir's role is similar to the Consort in that the Heir may act on behalf of the Ruler.

  • Leadership Ability: Wisdom or Charisma.
  • Vacancy Penalty: None.
  • Actions: Same as Ruler, except you have a -4 penalty to your Leadership check.

High Priest

The High Priest tends to the nation's religious needs and guides its growth. If the nation has an official religion, the High Priest may also be the highest-ranking member of that religion in the nation, and has similar responsibilities over the lesser priests of that faith to those the Grand Diplomat has over the nation's ambassadors and diplomats. If the nation has no official religion, the High Priest may be a representative of the most popular religion in the nation or a neutral party representing the interests of all religions allowed by the nation.

  • Leadership Ability: Wisdom or Charisma.
  • Vacancy Penalty: Stability and Loyalty decrease by 2. Unrest increases by 1.
  • Actions:
    • Divine blessing (Stability): You organize the nation's clergymen to beseech the gods to provide their blessing upon your nation. Select one of your nation's leaders. You provide a +2 enchantment bonus to their Leadership checks until the end of your nation's next Decision Phase.
    • National succor (Loyalty): You organize the nation's clergymen to provide relief and comfort to your nation's populace. Reduce Unrest by 1.
    • Religious festival (see Festival Edicts) You call organize a religious festival. See Festival Edicts for details.

Magister

The Magister guides the nation's higher learning and magic, promoting education and knowledge among the citizens and representing the interests of magic, science, and academia. In most nations, the Magister is a sage, a wizard, or a priest of a deity of knowledge, and oversees the governmental bureaucracy except regarding finance.

  • Leadership Ability: Intelligence or Charisma.
  • Vacancy Penalty: Economy decreases by 4.
  • Actions:
    • Commission magical item (Economy; 1 BP for minor, 3 BP for medium, 6 BP for major): You use your nation's arcane resources to create a magic item of your choice to fill in an empty magic item slot. The commissioned item takes the place of one item slot of that category for as long as it takes to craft (or improve) the item, including any month or portion of a month in which it is being crafted. During this time, no other item can be generated to fill that slot. The check DC increases by 1 for every 1,000 gp of the item's value. A failed check represents your BP being squandered through mismanagement and a failure onthe part of the item's crafters. You can take this action multiple times per Decision Phase, but each time after the first generates 1 point of Unrest, representing the anger and resentment of other customers from having their own requests being superseded by those of the country’s rulers, and of the crafters themselves for being forced to work on demand.
    • Curse nation (Economy): You organize the magical forces of your nation to cast a widespread curse upon the target nation. Select a nation and choose one of the following attributes: Economy, Loyalty, Stability. All leadership checks made for that attribute by the target nation receives a -2 enchantment penalty until your nation's next Decision Phase.
    • Divert magical resources (Economy): You divert your nation's magical resources of medium and major item slots for one month, reducing construction cost for buildings in the same city or terrain improvements in adjacent hexes by 3 BP for each major slot commissioned, 2 BP for each medium slot. You can take this action multiple times per Decision Phase, but each time after the first generates 1 point of Unrest, representing the anger and resentment of other customers from having their own requests being superseded by those of the country’s rulers, and of the crafters themselves for being forced to work on demand.
    • Enchant nation (Economy): You organize the magical forces of your nation to cast a nation wide enchantment. Select one of your nation's leaders. You provide a +2 enchantment bonus to their Leadership checks until your nation's next Decision Phase.
    • Vacate magic item slot (Economy): You manipulate your nation's economy to encourage an NPC to purchase a magical item currently occupying a settlement's magic item slot. The check's DC increases by 1 for every 1,000 gp of the item's value. Every time you make this check, your nation's Economy suffers a cumulative -1 penalty until the next Decision Phase.

Marshal

The Marshal ensures that the nation's laws are being enforced in the remote parts of the nation as well as in the vicinity of the capital. The Marshal is also responsible for securing the nation's borders. He organizes regular patrols and works with the General to respond to threats that militias and adventurers can't deal with alone.

  • Leadership Ability: Dexterity or Wisdom.
  • Vacancy Penalty: Economy decreases by 4.
  • Actions:
    • Assign scout team (no check): You may assign a scout team to a new home base (any hex with a settlement, Fort, or Watchtower that may house the team's size). The scout team must already be in reserve at their current home base. You may perform this action once per available scout team per Decision Phase.
    • Equip scout team (Economy; use army resource cost): You purchase an army resource for a scout team. The team must be in reserve. The team will acquire the resource at the start of your next Decision Phase.
    • Explore hexes (Stability): You send a scout team to explore hexes. You can assign any number of unassigned hexes for the scout team to explore, and the time to travel and explore those hexes follow the standard rules (see Exploration and Movement in Sandbox Campaigns. If there is an encounter in one of the explored hex, make a Stability check and add the scout team's OM to the check, and the encounter's CR to the DC. A successful check means that the hex has been explored, that your scout team overcame any encounter in the hex, and you gain full knowledge of that hex's contents. Failure represents that the scout team was lost, and the hex remains unexplored, resulting in a loss of 1d4 BP. A failure by 5 or more increases Unrest by 1 as rumours of danger spread or whatever killed your scouts becomes agitated. An exploring scout team's upkeep is paid monthly instead of weekly. You may performed this action once per available scout team per Decision Phase.
    • Recruit scout team (Loyalty; use army's cost): You must create a scout team first in order to perform many Marshal actions. A scout team is created and behaves the same as an army, and are usually built as Fine, Diminutive, or Tiny armies, although you may choose to build larger scout teams. Unlike an army, a Fine or Diminutive scout team can be created in any settlement without any required buildings. Larger scout teams have the same creation requirements as an army of the same size. When a scout team is created, you must assign it a home base, which could be either a Watchtower, Fort, or a settlement. A scout team away from their home base is unavailable for orders unless they have a means of direct communication with you. A newly created scout team begins at 1st level.
    • Scout armies (Stability): You have your scouts report to you the positions of every army they can find in your nation. Your Leadership check is calculated against each foreign army on any of your nation's hexes. Each army's size modifies the DC to beat in order to learn that army's position. See the Table:Scouting Armies DC for each army's size and DC modifier.
    • Train scouts (Loyalty, cost variable—see description): You put one of your scout teams through an intense training regimen to improve their skills. You can increase a scout team's level by 1 only once per Decision Phase. While training, your team must be in reserve and cannot take any other action. Training a team costs BP equal to the army's current ACR + 1 (minimum 1 BP). Add the team's current ACR to the Control DC. Your team's training will require a number of months equal half of its new ACR (minimum 1 month).

Table: Scouting Armies DC

Army Size DC modifier
Fine +8
Diminutive +4
Tiny +2
Small +1
Medium +0
Large -1
Huge -2
Gargantuan -4
Colossal -8
(+1) (-2)

Spymaster

The Spymaster observes the nation's criminal elements and underworld and spies on other nations. The Spymaster always has a finger on the pulse of the nation's underbelly, and uses acquired information to protect the interests of the nation at home and elsewhere through a network of spies and informants.

  • Leadership Ability: Dexterity or Charisma.
  • Vacancy Penalty: Economy decreases by 4. Unrest increases by 1.
  • Actions:
    • Counter-espionage (Stability): You task your spy network to focus on uncovering and halting covert foreign operations within your nation. Increase the DC for all Spymaster actions made by another nation targeting your nation by 2 until your next the beginning of your next Decision Phase. For every 5 that you beat the DC, increase the DC bonus by 1.
    • Influence target (Economy): Through bribery or blackmail, you gain significant influence of an individual. Select a target character to influence, and another character to benefit from the influence. The target character becomes helpful to the benefiting character until the beginning of your next Decision Phase.
    • Issue espionage edict (see Espionage Edicts): You issue your espionage edicts. You may take this action multiple times during the Decision Phase.

Treasurer

The Treasurer monitors the state of the nation's Treasury and citizens' confidence in the value of their money and investigates whether any businesses are taking unfair advantage of the system. The Treasurer is in charge of the tax collectors and tracks debts and credits with guilds and other governments.

  • Leadership Ability: Intelligence or Wisdom.
  • Vacancy Penalty: Economy decreases by 4. The kingdom cannot collect taxes—during the Edict Phase, when you would normally collect taxes, the kingdom does not collect taxes at all and the taxation level is considered "none."
  • Actions:
    • Accelerate Construction (Economy): You reduce the remaining construction time of a building by 1 month. If the remaining time reaches 0 month, then the building is completed at the end of the Decision Phase. For every 10 that you beat the DC, you reduce the remaining time by another month.
    • Delay debt payment (Loyalty): During the Upkeep phase, you may attempt to not pay some or all of your nation's Consumption. Make a Loyalty check, and add twice the amount of Consumption you refuse to pay to the check's DC. Success means that you do not have to pay that amount for this month, however Unrest increases by the same amount. For every 10 that your check beats the DC, reduce the amount of Unrest gained by 1 (minimum 1). Failure means that your nation must pay the full amount of its Consumption.
    • Invest BP (Economy): Choose an amount of BP to invest in local businesses, and make an Economy check. Success rewards you with a bonus to Economy equal to the amount of BP invested until your next decision phase. You can spread this bonus equally over a number of months (minimum +1 per month). For every 10 that your check beats the DC, your bonus increases by +1. Failure indicates that you have lost you investment.
    • Issue taxation edicts (see Taxation Edicts): You issue or adjust your taxation edict levels. You can take this action only once per Decision Phase.
    • Issue trade edicts (see Trade Edicts): You issue or adjust your trade edict levels. You can take this action only once per Decision Phase.
    • Request a loan (Economy): Your government requests funds from your nation's moneylenders. Make a Loyalty check. The DC increases by twice the amount of BP requested. If you succeed, your treasury increases by the amount requested, but your nation gains a debt which increases Consumption by 2 for a number of months equal to the amount of BP requested. Failure means your loan was denied and no BP is gained.
    • Withdraw funds (Loyalty; no cost): Each time you withdraw BP for your personal use, Unrest increases by the number of BP withdrawn. Each BP you withdraw this way converts to 2,000 gp of personal funds. You can reduce the amount of Unrest by 1 (minimum 1) with a successful Loyalty check. For every 10 that you beat the DC, reduce the amount of Unrest by an additional 1.

Viceroy

The Viceroy represents the Ruler's interests on an ongoing basis in a specific location such as a colony or vassal state (see the optional Vassalage edict). The Viceroy is in effect the Ruler for that territory; her orders are superseded only by direct commands from the Ruler.

  • Leadership Ability: Wisdom or Charisma.
  • Vacancy Penalty: If you have no Viceroy for your vassal state, treat it as if it had the Ruler vacancy penalty.
  • Actions: Same as Ruler.

Warden

The Warden is responsible for enforcing laws in larger settlements, as well as ensuring the safety of the nation leaders. The Warden also works with the General to deploy forces to protect settlements and react to internal threats.

  • Leadership Ability: Strength or Constitution.
  • Vacancy Penalty: Loyalty and Stability decrease by 2. Unrest increases by 1.
  • Actions:
    • Crackdown (Stability): You provide additional resources to your law enforcement agencies to come down harder on crime. Reduce Unrest by 1. For every 10 that you beat the DC, the amount reduced increases by 1.
    • Outreach (Loyalty): You provide the resources to your law enforcement agencies need to reach out to the public and engender good will between them. Your nation's Stability gains a +2 bonus until the end of your next Decision Phase.

Hexes


Losing Hexes

If you lose control of a hex—whether because of Unrest, monster attacks, assaults from a hostile nation, and so on—you lose all the benefits of any terrain improvements in that hex (such as Farms and Roads). All settlements in that hex become free cities with no loyalty to you or any other nation (see Free City). At the GM's discretion, monsters may move into the abandoned hex, requiring you to clear it again if you want to claim it later, and terrain improvements may decay over time.

Losing a hex may break your connection to other nation hexes. For example, losing the only hex that bridges two sides of a mountain range creates two separate territories. If this happens, the primary territory is the part of the nation with your capital city (see sidebar), and the rest of the kingdom is the secondary territory. If none of the nation's leaders are in the secondary territory when this split happens, you lose control of all hexes (as described above) in the secondary territory.

If at least one nation leader is in the secondary territory when the split occurs, you retain control of the secondary territory, but leadership checks regarding its hexes treat Unrest as 1 higher, increasing by 1 each turn after the split. This modifier goes away if you claim a hex that reconnects the secondary territory to the primary territory.

If you claim a hex that reestablishes a connection to a leaderless secondary territory, you regain the benefits of the territory's terrain improvements. your nation's Ruler must succeed at a Stability check to reclaim each of your former settlements in the secondary territory. You initially have a +5 bonus on these checks because the cities want to return to your nation, but this bonus decreases by 1 (to a minimum bonus of +0) for each subsequent turn since you lost control of the secondary territory.

If your nation is reduced to 0 hexes—whether through Unrest, a natural disaster, an attack by another nation, or other circumstances—you are at risk of losing the nation. On your next turn, you must claim a new hex and found or claim a new settlement, or your nation is destroyed and you must start over if you want to found a new nation. At the GM's discretion, you may be able to keep some BP from your destroyed nation's Treasury for a time; otherwise, those assets are lost.

Terrain Improvements

Terrain improvements are changes to a hex that improve the land for your kingdom's use, such as cultivating fields, digging mines, and clearing forests for lumber. The following list describes common improvements. An improvement marked with an asterisk (*) can share the same hex as other improvements.

Some terrain improvements affect a settlement's Defense, which is used in the mass combat rules.

Terrain: This indicates what kind of hex you can build this terrain improvement in.

Effect: This line states the effect the terrain improvement has on that hex (or in some cases, your entire kingdom).

If an improvement says you can upgrade it into another improvement, you can do so by paying the cost difference between the two improvements. When the upgrade is complete, you lose the benefit of the old improvement but gain the benefit of the new improvement.

Cost: Base cost to build this improvement. Multiply this by the Terrain Multiplier depending on the type of terrain of the hex.

Construction Time: Number of months to build this improvement. Multiply this by the Terrain Multiplier depending on the type of terrain of the hex.

Terrain Multiplier: Multiply the cost and the construction time of the improvement built in this type of terrain by this number.

Base Population: Once a hex is claimed by your nation, people are generally free to set up individual homes there, adding to your nation's overall population. This population is on top of that of a settlement in the same hex, as it represents people not living in the settlement.

Table: Terrain and Terrain Improvements
Terrain Exploration Time Preparation Time Preparation Cost Terrain Cost Multiplier Base Population Danger
Arctic 2 days 1 month 4 BP x3 10 +10
Cavern 3 days 3 months 8 BP x3 25 +20
Coastline Special Special Special Special x2
Desert 2 days 1 month 4 BP x3 25 +5
Forest 2 days 2 months 4 BP x2 50 +5
Hills 1 day 1 month 2 BP x1.5 75
Jungle 2 days 3 months 8 BP x3 50 +10
Marsh 3 days 3 months 8 BP x3 25 +10
Mountains 3 days 4 months 12 BP x4 25 +10
Plains 1 day Immediate 1 BP x1 100
River Special Special Special Special x2
Tundra 1 day 1 month 2 BP x1 25 +5
Water 2 days +5

Aqueduct*
An Aqueduct brings water from alpine lakes and rivers to lowland cities where water is scarce or insufficient for the local populace. A finished series of Aqueduct hexes must connect to a hill or mountain hex (with a river or lake) on one end and a settlement on the other end; otherwise, you do not gain its benefit.
Terrain: One end must be hill or mountain hex; can pass through any type of hex.
Effect: Loyalty +1, Stability +1, allows settlement to build water-dependent buildings.
Cost: As a Road, except the cost is not doubled for hexes with rivers.
Construction Time: 1 month.

Bridge*
A Bridge allows your Road hexes to cross rivers.
Effect: Population +25.
Cost: When you build a Road in a hex that contains a river, double the cost. You don't need to build a Bridge as a separate unit; it's listed here for reference only.
Construction Time: Like the cost, a Bridge is not a separate unit; instead the construction time of the Road is doubled.

Canal*
A Canal is an artificial waterway that allows barge traffic to haul heavy commodities. A canal must connect to a hex with a body of water or another canal.
Terrain: Desert, hill, or plain.
Effect: Settlements in a hex with a Canal treat the hex as if it had a river. Population +25.
Cost: Twice the cost of a Road.
Construction Time: Twice the construction time of a Road.

Farm*
A Farm helps feed your kingdom.
Terrain: Desert (requires aqueduct, canal, coastline, or river), forest, hill, plain, or underground.
Effect: Consumption decreases by 2 BP. Population +100.
Cost: 2 BP.
Construction Time: 1 month.

Fishery*
A Fishery is like a Farm, except it provides abundant fish rather than planted crops.
Terrain: Coastline, water, river, or marsh.
Effect: Consumption decreased by 2 BP. Population +50.
Cost: 4 BP.
Construction Time: 1 month.

Fort*
A Fort is a walled encampment for military forces outside a settlement. You can upgrade a Watchtower to a Fort (Unrest decreases when you do so, just as if you had built the Fort from scratch). A Fort can housed up to 2,000 units.
Terrain: Any land.
Effect: Stability +2, Defense +4 (multiply the Defense bonus by the Terrain Multiplier), increase Consumption by 1 BP; Unrest -1. Population +50. Danger -10.
Cost: 24 BP.
Construction Time: 6 months.

Highway*
A highway is a paved and well-maintained version of a Road. You may upgrade a Road into a Highway.
Terrain: Any hex with a Road.
Effect: Economy +1 for every 4 hexes of Highway, Stability +1 for every 8 hexes of Highway; improves overland travel speed. Population +25. Danger -5.
Cost: Twice the cost of a Road in BP.
Construction Time: 1 month.

Inn*
A traveler's inn provides food, lodging, and stabling for travelers.
Terrain: Any hex with a Road or Highway.
Effect: Economy +1, Loyalty +1. If this hex becomes a settlement, this improvement counts as an Inn building. Population +25.
Cost: 10 BP.
Construction Time: 2 months.

Mine
A Mine extracts metal, coal, salt, or other useful materials from the earth. A mine lasts for 25 years before being exhausted.
Terrain: Cavern, desert, hill, or mountain containing an eligible resource.
Effect: Economy +1, earn +1 BP per turn when collecting taxes during the Income Phase. Population +25. Danger +5.
Cost: 6 BP.
Construction Time: 1 month.

Quarry
A Quarry extracts workable stone from the ground. A quarry lasts 50 years before being exhausted.
Terrain: Cavern, hill, or mountain.
Effect: Stability +1, earn +1 BP per turn when collecting taxes during the Income Phase. Population +25.
Cost: 6 BP.
Construction Time: 1 month.

Road*
A Road speeds travel through your kingdom and promotes trade. You can upgrade a Road to a Highway.
Terrain: Any land.
Effect: Economy +1 for every 4 hexes of Road, Stability +1 for every 8 hexes of Road; improves overland travel speed.
Cost: See the Road column of Table: Terrain and Terrain Improvements.
Construction Time: 1 month.

Sawmill
A sawmill centralizes the activities of loggers and turns trees into lumber for use in building and crafting.
Terrain: Forest or jungle.
Effect: Stability +1, earn +1 BP per turn when collecting taxes during the Income Phase. Population +25.
Cost: 3 BP.
Construction Time: 1 month.

Vineyard
Terrain: A vineyard is a specialized farm that is built in hill hexes.
Effect: Economy +1. If a vineyard is adjacent to a city, a Brewery can be built in that city for one less BP (minimum 1 BP). Population +50.
Cost: 3 BP.
Construction Time: 1 month.

Watchtower*
A Watchtower flies your flag, is a safe place for your patrols, and establishes your power on the frontier. A Watchtower cannot share a hex with a Fort or another Watchtower. A Watchtower can house up to 50 units.
Terrain: Any land.
Effect: Stability +1, Defense +2 (multiply the Defense bonus by the Terrain Multiplier); Unrest -1. If this hex becomes a settlement, this improvement counts as a Watchtower building. Population +25. Danger -5.
Cost: 12 BP.
Construction Time: 2 months.

Well
A Well extracts gases, oil, or water from beneath the surface of the earth. A well lasts for 25 years before being exhausted.
Terrain: Cavern, desert, hill, or mountain containing an eligible resource.
Effect: Economy +1, earn +1 BP per turn when collecting taxes during the Income Phase. Population +25. Danger +5.
Cost: 6 BP.

Special Terrain

Some hexes contain features or resources that impact a nation's Economy, Loyalty, Stability, and other game statistics. These terrain resources are placed by the GM—not by player characters—for you to discover while exploring or adventuring, and may modify terrain improvements or cities.

Bridge: The hex contains an existing Bridge over a waterway. If you build a Road in this hex, you do not have to double the cost of the Road.

Building: The hex contains an abandoned building in good repair (type determined by the GM). If you establish a settlement at the building's location in the hex, you can incorporate the building into the settlement at no cost.

Free City: A Free City is a settlement that is not part of any established nation. Claiming a hex with a Free City is an excellent way to add a fully functional settlement to your nation. In order to claim a Free City hex peacefully, your nation's Ruler must succeed at a Stability check. Failure indicates radicals and upstarts in the settlement and Unrest increases by 1d4.

Lair: A Lair is usually a cave or defensible shelter that can be used as a defensive fallback point, a storage location, or even a guardpost or prison. If you claim a hex with a Lair, Stability increases by 1. If you construct a Fort or Watchtower over a Lair, its Defense increases by 1. At the GM's option, a Lair may allow access to an underground cavern hex (see Table: Terrain and Terrain Improvements).

Landmark: A Landmark is a site of great pride, mystery, and wonder, such as an outcropping in the shape of a human face, a smoking volcano, or a lake with an unusual color or unique properties. The Landmark bolsters your nation's morale. If you claim a hex with a Landmark, Loyalty increases by 1. If the hex also has a Road or Highway, Loyalty increases by an additional 1.

Resource: A Resource is a ready supply of some kind of valuable commodity that offers a great economic boon to your nation, such as exotic lumber, precious metal, gems, rare herbs, incense, silk, ivory, furs, salt, dyes, and the like. If you claim a hex with a Resource, Economy increases by 1. If you construct a Mine, Quarry, Sawmill, or Well in a hex with a Resource, all of its benefits increase by 1. If you construct a Farm or Fishery in a hex with a Resource, those improvements decrease Consumption by an additional 1 BP.

River: A River allows water travel through your nation, facilitating trade and allowing irrigation. Economy increases by 1 for every 4 River hexes claimed, and Stability increases by 1 for every 8 such hexes claimed.

Ruin: A Ruin is a partially destroyed building. If you claim a hex containing a Ruin and build a settlement at the Ruin's location, you can use the Ruin as the basis of an appropriate type of building (as determined by the GM), reducing the cost of that building by half. Alternatively, you can salvage building materials from the Ruin, reducing the cost of 1 building in that hex by 1d4 BP.

Table: Resources
Improvement Resource
Farm Allnight, banana, barbarian chew, belladonna, camouflage lichen, dreamer's star, dye, flayleaf, frankincense, garlic, ginger, goblinvine, golden maple leaves, holly, keif, leechwort, meditation tea, mistletoe, moondew, mugwort, myrrh, night tea, olives, poppy tears, rubber, tobacco, twilight dagger, winterbite, wolfsbane
Fishery Clam, dye, fish
Mine Adamantine, aetherite, aetherium, aluminum, bronze, coal, cold iron, copper, gemstones, gold, iron, lead, magnesium, platinum, phosphorous, quicksilver, realgar, salt, saltpeter, silver, thorium, tungsten, uranium
Quarry Marble, obsidian, salt, stone, sulfur
Sawmill Darkwood, lumber
Well Natural gas, oil, water

Settlements


Founding a Settlement

Before you can start your own nation, you first need a base of operations—a fort, village, or other settlement—where you can rest between adventures and where your citizens know they can find you if they need help or want to pay their taxes. Once you have a nation, you'll want to create more settlements in order for the nation to grow and prosper. To found a settlement, you must perform the following steps. (These steps assume you're building a new settlement from scratch; if you're attempting to incorporate an existing settlement into your kingdom, see Free City.)

Step 1—Acquire funds. You'll need money and resources in the form of build points.

Step 2—Explore and clear a hex. You'll need to explore the hex where you want to put the settlement. See the Exploration Time column on Table: Terrain and Terrain Improvements to see how long this takes. Once you have explored the hex, clear it of monsters and dangerous hazards. The time needed to clear it depends on the nature of the threats; this step is usually handled by you completing adventures there to kill or drive out monsters.

Step 3—Claim the hex as yours. Once you have BP and have explored and cleared the hex, you can claim it. This is done using the Ruler's leadership action during the Decision Phase. This establishes the hex as part of your nation (or the beginning of your nation).

Step 4—Prepare the site for construction. To put a settlement on a claimed hex, you'll need to prepare it using the Ruler's leadership action during the Decision Phase. Depending on the site, this process may involve clearing trees, moving boulders, digging sanitation trenches, and so on. See the Preparation Cost column on Table: Terrain and Terrain Improvements for the BP cost.

If your settlement is in a hex containing a canal, lake, ocean, river, or similar large body of water, then your settlement is considered to have access to a body of water. Some types of buildings, such as Mills, Piers, and Waterfronts must have access to a body of water.

Step 5—Construct your first buildings. Construct 1 building in your settlement and pay its BP cost. If this is your nation's first settlement, you should start with an Inn, Shrine, Monastery, or Watchtower. In addition, you may also purchase and construct 1 House, Mansion, Noble Villa, or Tenement. If your first building is an Inn, you must construct a House or Tenement as well, as building an Inn requires a House or Tenement in the settlement.

When you complete these steps, you've founded your settlement! If this is your first settlement, it's considered your nation's capital city.

Magic Items in Settlements

In addition to the commonly available items in a settlement as determined by its base value, some buildings increase the likelihood of having specific or unusual magic items available for purchase.

Gaining Item Slots: When you construct one of these buildings, mark the appropriate boxes in the Magic Items section for that settlement; this indicates that the settlement has gained a slot for an item of that type.

Filling Item Slots: In the Upkeep Phase, you roll to fill vacant magic item slots in each district. Roll d% once for open magic item slot. There is a 50% chance (51–100) that an appropriate magic item becomes available in that slot. This item's price cannot exceed the base value for the settlement (reroll if the item's price exceeds the settlement's base value).

Emptying Item Slots: If you are unsatisfied with a magic item generated by a settlement, there are three ways to purge an undesirable item and make its slot vacant. The first is to purchase it with your own gp, which makes it your personal property and means you may do with it what you please (use it, sell it at half price for gold, deposit it in the nation's Treasury during the next Income Phase, use it as a reward for a local general, and so on).

The second method is to manipulate your nation's economy to encourage an NPC to purchase the item (such as a random adventurer passing through the settlement). During the Decision Phase, your nation's Magister may attempt one Economy check for a filled slot you want to empty. For every such check, your Economy suffers a cumulative -1 penalty until the next Decision Phase, since these manipulations are harmful to your nation's economy and typically only serve to get rid of an item you consider undesirable. If the check fails, nothing happens. If the check succeeds, erase the item from that slot; you may attempt to fill the empty slot as normal in the next Upkeep Phase. You do not gain any gp or BP from this sale; the money goes to the building's owner, who uses it to acquire or craft the next item.

The third way is to spend BP (1 BP = 2,000 gp) to purchase the item. If you take the item for your own use, this counts as withdrawing BP from the Treasury for your personal use (see Withdraw from treasury leadership action for the Treasurer). If you use the item in a way that doesn't directly benefit you or the other PCs (such as giving it to a hero of your army or donating it to a settlement as a religious or historical artifact), then purchasing it is essentially like other nation expenditures and does not increase Unrest or decrease Loyalty.

Settlement Modifiers

Base Value: The base value associated with a settlement is tied to the number of trade-based buildings it has. Each such building, whether it’s a shop, tavern, or brothel, increases a settlement’s base value. Any nonmagical item is always available if its cost is lower than the settlement’s base value.

Community Wealth: Community wealth is the limit of actual currency or the value of the total amount of a single good that is available in a settlement. Community wealth is determined by multiplying half of the settlement's purchase limit by 1/10 of the settlement's population. For example, a Hamlet with a base value of 500 gp with a population of 90 has a community wealth of 1,125 gp. A group of adventurers could exchange up to 1,125 g worth of gems for hard currency, or purchase up to 75 longswords in this settlement.

Danger: A settlement's danger value is a number that gives a general idea of how dangerous it is to live in the settlement. If you use wandering monster chart that uses percentile dice and ranks its encounters from lowest Cr to highest CR, use the modifier associated with the settlement's danger value to adjust rolls on the encounter chart. A settlement's base danger value depends on its type.

Defensive Modifier: A settlement's Defensive Modifier can be increased by building certain structures (such as city walls) and has an impact on mass combat.

Districts: Larger settlements are split into districts that limit certain settlement improvements.

Population: A settlement's population is equal to the number of house and tenements x 50.

Purchase Limit: A settlement's purchase limit is the most money a shop in the settlement can spend to purchase any single item from the PCs. If the PCs wish to sell an item worth more than a settlement's purchase limit, they'll either need to settle for a lower price, travel to a larger city, or search for a specific buyer in the city with deeper pockets. A settlement's purchase limit is half of its base value.

Resource Minimum: This number indicates how many sources of the same resource that the settlement is connected to in order to consider that resource as available. If the settlement is not connected to enough resource sources, then it is forced to import materials from outside sources to supplement what it needs, resulting in additional costs for constructing a building that requires those materials.

Settlement Modifier: Settlements possess six modifiers that apply to specific skill checks made in the settlement. A settlement's starting modifier values are determined by its type. This value is further adjusted by the settlement's alignment, government, qualities, and disadvantages.

Size A settlement's size is determined by its population.

Spellcasting Unlike magic items, spellcasting for hire is listed separately from the town's base value, since spellcasting is limited by the level of the available spellcasters in town. The highest-level spell available for purchase from spellcasters in town depends on the settlement's size. This limit may be increased by other factors.

Size Settlement Modifier Population Spellcasting Defensive Modifier Districts Resource Minimum Danger
Thorpe -4 20-80 1st +0 1 1 -20
Hamlet -2 81–400 1st +0 1 1 -15
Village -1 401-900 1st +0 1 1 -10
Small town 0 901-2,000 2nd -2 4 2 -5
Large town 0 2,001-5,000 2nd -4 9 2 0
Small city +1 5,001-12,000 3rd -8 16 3 +5
Large city +2 12,001-25,000 3rd -12 25 4 +10
Metropolis +4 25,001-50,000 4th -16 36 5 +20
(Metropolis+1) (+4) (+25,000) (+1/2; max. 9th) (-4) (+36) (+1) (+20)
  • Corruption: Corruption measures how open a settlement's officials are to bribes, how honest its citizens are, and how likely anyone in town is to report a crime. Low corruption indicates a high level of civic honesty. A settlement's corruption modifies:
    • all Bluff checks against city officials and guards,
    • all Stealth checks made inside of the settlement (but not inside buildings or underground).
  • Crime: Crime is a measure of a settlement's lawlessness. A settlement with a low crime modifier is relatively safe, with violent crimes being rare or even unknown, while a settlement with a high crime modifier is likely to have A powerful thieves' guild and a significant problem with violence. The atmosphere generated by a settlement's crime level applies as a modifier on:
    • Sense Motive checks to avoid being bluffed,
    • to Sleight of Hand checks made to pick pockets.
  • Law: Law measures how strict a settlement's laws and edicts are. A settlement with a low law modifier isn't necessarily crime-ridden—in fact, A low law modifier usually indicates that the town simply has little need for protection since crime is so rare. A high law modifier means the settlement's guards are particularly alert, vigilant, and well-organized. The more lawful A town is, the more timidly its citizens tend to respond to shows of force. A settlement's law modifier applies on:
    • Intimidate checks made to force an opponent to act friendly,
    • Diplomacy checks against government officials,
    • Diplomacy checks made to call on the city guard.
  • Lore: A settlement's lore modifier measures not only how willing the citizens are to chat and talk with visitors, but also how available and accessible its libraries and sages are. A low lore modifier doesn't mean the settlement's citizens are idiots, just that they're close-mouthed or simply lack knowledge resources. A settlement's lore modifier applies on:
    • Diplomacy checks made to gather information,
    • Knowledge checks made using the city's resources to do research when using a library.
  • Productivity: A settlement's productivity modifier indicates the health of its trade and the wealth of its successful citizens. A low productivity modifier doesn't automatically mean the town is beset with poverty—it could merely indicate a town with little trade or one that is relatively self-sufficient. Towns with high productivity modifiers always have large markets and many shops. A settlement's productivity helps its citizens make money, and thus it applies as a modifier on:
    • all Craft checks,
    • all Perform and Profession checks to generate income.
  • Society: Society measures how open-minded and civilized A settlement's citizens are. A low society modifier might mean many of the citizens harbor prejudices or are overly suspicious of out-of-towners. A high society modifier means that citizens are used to diversity and unusual visitors and that they respond better to well-spoken attempts at conversation. A settlement's society modifier applies on:
    • all Disguise checks,
    • Diplomacy checks made to alter the attitude of any non-government official.

Settlement Qualities

Settlements often have unusual qualities that make them unique. Listed below are several different qualities that can further modify a community's statistics. A settlement's qualities are determined by the improvements built within it and its size.

Note that many of the following qualities adjust a town's base value or purchase limit by a percentage of the town's standard values. If a town has multiple qualities of this sort, add together the percentages from modifiers and then increase the base value by that aggregated total—do not apply the increases one at a time.

  • Academic: The settlement possesses a school, training facility, or university of great renown. (Lore +1, increase spellcasting by 1 level) Requires Academy or Library, and settlement size Large Town or greater.
  • Holy Site: The settlement hosts a shrine, temple, or landmark with great significance to one or more religions. The settlement has a higher percentage of divine spellcasters in its population. (Corruption –2; increase spellcasting by 2 levels) Requires Cathedral, 3 Temples, or 5 Shrines.
  • Insular: The settlement is isolated, perhaps physically or even spiritually. Its citizens are fiercely loyal to one another. (Law +1; Crime –1) Requires no roads or rivers connected to the settlement, and not built in a plains or hills hex.
  • Magically Attuned: The settlement is a haven for spellcasters due to its location; for example, it may lie at the convergence of multiple ley lines or near a well-known magical site. (Increase base value by 20%; increase purchase limit by 20%; increase spellcasting by 2 levels) Requires 3 Caster's Towers.
  • Notorious: The settlement has a reputation (deserved or not) for being a den of iniquity. Thieves, rogues, and cutthroats are much more common here. (Crime +1; Law –1; Danger +10; increase base value by 30%; increase purchase limit by 50%) Requires Black Market, and settlement size Large Town or greater.
  • Pious: The settlement is known for its inhabitants' good manners, friendly spirit, and deep devotion to a deity (this deity must be of the same alignment as the community). (Increase spellcasting by 1 level; any faith more than one alignment step different than the community's official religion is at best unwelcome and at worst outlawed—obvious worshipers of an outlawed deity must pay 150% of the normal price for goods and services and may face mockery, insult, or even violence)
  • Prosperous: The settlement is a popular hub for trade. Merchants are wealthy and the citizens live well. (Productivity +1; increase base value by 30%; increase purchase limit by 50%) Requires 2 Markets or Waterfront, and settlement size Large Town or greater.
  • Racially Intolerant: The community is prejudiced against one or more races, which are listed in parentheses. (Members of the unwelcome race or races must pay 150% of the normal price for goods and services and may face mockery, insult, or even violence)
  • Rumormongering Citizens: The settlement's citizens are nosy and gossipy to a fault—very little happens in the settlement that no one knows about. (Lore +1; Society –1)
  • Strategic Location: The settlement sits at an important crossroads or alongside a deepwater port, or it serves as a barrier to a pass or bridge. (Productivity +1; increase base value by 10%)
  • Superstitious: The community has a deep and abiding fear of magic and the unexplained, but this fear has caused its citizens to become more supportive and loyal to each other and their settlement. (Crime –4; Law and Society +2; reduce spellcasting by 2 levels)
  • Tourist Attraction: The settlement possesses some sort of landmark or event that draws visitors from far and wide. (Productivity +1; increase base value by 20%) Requires Arena, or 4 Monuments, and settlement size Large Town or greater.

Settlement Buildings

You improve settlements by constructing buildings, which provide bonuses to the nation in general and the settlement in particular. Some buildings also intersect with the mass combat rules, notably with fortifications and reserve armies.

Construction Time: A building's construction time indicates how months it will take before the building is complete. The building's cost is paid at the time of commission, but the building's modifiers are not applied to the nation. At the start of the Upkeep phase, all buildings currently under construction reduces its remaining time by 1 month. At 0 months remaining, the building is complete, and its modifiers can be applied to the nation.

Demolition: If a lot has a building, you can clear it for new construction. Doing so costs 1 BP. You may construct a building on a lot the same turn you demolish the old building there. You do not regain BP for a demolished building (but see Rebuilding, below).

Destroyed Lots: If an event or a pillaging army destroys 1 or more buildings, the devastation causes Unrest to increase by 1 per building destroyed.

Rebuilding: If you rebuild the same type of building on a destroyed lot, the cost is halved, as you can reuse some of the materials for the same purpose. If you rebuild a different type of building on that lot, reduce the cost of the new building by 1/4 the cost of the old building (minimum 1 BP). If you build smaller buildings on top of a site that held a multi-lot building, split the discount evenly over the new buildings. For example, if you demolish an Academy and construct a Mansion and a Luxury Store on top of those lots, each building gets a 6 BP discount (1/4 of 52 BP is 13, divided evenly between the two).

Requirements: Some buildings have requirements that must be fulfilled before its modifiers can be applied, such as a settlement reaching a certain size or specific buildings must already be present in the settlement. If a settlement loses those requirements at a later time, then the buildings affected no longer applies their modifiers.

Resources Needed: Some buildings require specific resources gathered from other hexes. A settlement is considered to have access to those resources if there is a road connecting that settlement to the resource hex. The cost of buildings in a settlement that do not have access to their required resource increases by 50% of the base cost for each missing resource as those resources have to be imported through more difficult means. A settlement can gain access to a resource hex in another nation if there is a road connecting the two and there is a resource treaty between your nation and the other nation.
    As settlements grow, the demand for resources increases. A settlement's size determines how many hexes of a resource it must be connected to in order for buildings to have access to that resource. Otherwise, the settlement must pay extra to import the resource from elsewhere.

Duplicate Buildings

Having more than one type of building in the same district provides very little benefit as it oversaturates its potential audience or market. Unless otherwise noted, each type of building is limited to 1 per district. Duplicate buildings that exceed the settlement's number of district do not provide any nation bonuses. Nation penalties and increases to Unrest still apply. Settlement modifiers also still apply. This does not apply to Bridges, City Walls, Houses, Moats, Parks, Tenements, and Waterways. Some building have subtypes, such as Exotic Artisan (firearms) or Temple (Kaï-den). As long as the subtype is different, each of the same building counts as unique.

Improvement Base Cost Construction Time Resources Needed Requirements Description Effects
Academy 52 BP 9 months Lumber Large Town An institution of higher learning that can focus on any area of knowledge or education, including magic. Upgrade From Library; Upgrade To University. Economy +2, Loyalty +2; Lore +2, Productivity +1, Society +2; 3 minor scrolls or wondrous items, 2 medium scrolls or wondrous items; halves cost of Caster’s Tower, Library, Magic Shop, School; increase Lore bonus by 2 for questions relating to one Knowledge or Profession skill.
Aerie 18 BP 3 months Lumber, Stone Small Town A specialized tower suitable for raising and training hunting and message birds as well as stabling flying mounts. Can reserve an army of 50 flying units. Stability +2; Unrest -1; Defense +1 (+2 in hills with a river of a coastline or mountains); +2 bonus to Stability checks against Monster Attacks involving flying creatures.
Alchemist 18 BP 3 months Lumber Small Town The laboratory and home of a creator of potions, poisons, and alchemical items. Base value +1,000 gp; Economy +1; 1 minor potion or wondrous item.
Arena 40 BP 4 months Stone Small City A large public structure for competitions, demonstrations, team sports, or bloodsports. Upgrade From Theater Economy +2, Stability +4; Crime +1; Fame +1; halves cost of Garrison, Theater; halves Consumption increase penalty for holiday edicts; limit 1 per settlement.
Assembly 30 BP 6 months Stone Small City A conclave of representatives from all sectors of society, including representatives from guilds, religious orders, civil authorities, allowing all factions a voice in governance. When you issue an Improvement Edict, you can build one additional building in a city with an Assembly or one additional terrain improvement in a hex containing that city or adjacent to it. Economy: +2, Stability +1; Corruption +1, Law +1, Society +2; Fame +1; limit 1 per settlement.
Bank 28 BP 7 months Stone Large Town A secure building for storing valuables and granting loans. Base value +2,000 gp; Economy +4.
Bardic College 40 BP 8 months Lumber, Stone Small Town A center for artistic learning. Education in a Bardic College also includes research into a wide-range of historical topics. Economy +1, Loyalty +3, Stability +1; Lore +2; Fame +1; 2 minor scrolls or wondrous items; halves cost of Library, Museum, Theater.
Barracks 6 BP 1 month Stone Small Town A building to house city guards, militia, and military forces. It can house up to 100 units. Upgrade to Garrison. Unrest -1; Defense +2; Law +1.
Baths 4 BP 1 month Stone Small Town; settlement must be in a hex containing a body of water, canal, or aqueduct A public building for bathing, often with hot running water and mineral soaks, sometimes heated by furnaces and other times by natural hot springs. Economy: +1, Stability +1.
Black Market 50 BP 5 months Lumber Large Town A number of shops with secret and usually illegal or dangerous wares. Base value +2,000; Economy +2, Stability +1; Unrest +4; Corruption +2, Crime +2; 2 minor items, 1 medium item, 1 major item; halves cost of Brothel.
Brewery 6 BP 1 month Lumber Village A building for beermaking, winemaking, or similar use. Loyalty +1, Stability +1; halves cost of Inn and Tavern.
Brickyard 16 BP 4 months Stone Village An industrial center for cutting and shaping stone, grinding gravel, and firing bricks for construction. The cost to construct Quarries in the settlement’s hex or adjacent hexes is reduced to 4 BP. In addition, Quarries in those hexes generate 1 additional BP for every 2 Quarries. If a Quarry is adjacent to two settlements with Brickyards, only one Brickyard may benefit from that Quarry each kingdom turn. Economy +1, Stability +1; Productivity +1.
Bureau 10 BP 2 months Lumber Small City A large warren of offices for clerks and record-keepers working for a guild or government. Economy +1, Loyalty -1, Stability +1; Corruption +1, Law +1.
Brothel 4 BP 2 months Lumber Small Town A place to pay for companionship of any sort. Economy +1, Loyalty +1; Unrest +1; Corruption +1, Crime +1, Society +1; Infamy +1; -1 penalty to Stability checks to resist Drug Den and Plague events.
Caster’s Tower 30 BP 5 months Stone Small Town The home and laboratory for a spellcaster. Economy +1, Loyalty +1; Lore +1; 3 minor items, 2 medium items.
Castle 54 BP 12 months Stone Small City The home of the city’s leader or the heart of its defenses. It can house up to 200 units. Economy +2, Loyalty +2, Stability +2; Unrest -4; Defense +8; halves cost of Noble Villa, Town Hall; limit 1 per settlement.
Cathedral 58 BP 12 months Stone Small City The focal point of the city’s religion and spiritual leadership. Unrest -4; Lore +1; 3 minor items, 2 medium items; halves cost of Academy, Temple; halves Consumption increase penalty for Promotion Edicts; limit 1 per settlement.
Cistern 6 BP 1 month Lumber Village Contains a safe supply of fresh water for the settlement. Stability +1.
City Stone Wall 4 BP 2 months Stone A sturdy, high wall made of stone that provides defense for a portion of the city. Unrest -2; Defense +2; limit 1 per district.
City Wooden Wall 2 BP 1 month Lumber A sturdy, high wall made of wood that provides defense for a portion of the city. Unrest -1; Defense +1; limit 1 per district.
Colossus 60 BP 12 months Stone Large Town A towering edifice of stone and burnished metal displays your power to the world. A Colossus may be a great statue, obelisk, tower, pyramid, mausoleum, triumphal arch, or nearly anything else; all that is required is superior craftsmanship, titanic proportions, and grandiose civic pride. When your armies in the same hex as a settlement with a Colossus, they gain a +1 bonus to Morale; if they are inside the city, they gain a +2 bonus. A Colossus can share the same space as a Lighthouse or Observatory (but not both). Economy +2, Loyalty +4, Stability +2; Unrest -2; Law +2; Fame +1; halves cost of Lighthouse, Monument, Observatory, Park; limit 1 per settlement.
Courthouse 16 BP 4 months Stone Large Town A hall of justice, for hearing cases and resolving disputes by the rule of law. Loyalty +2; Corruption -1, Crime -1, Law +2; halves cost of Jail.
Crematorium 4 BP 1 months Stone Village; Dump or Graveyard A specialized furnace building primarily used for burning the dead into ash, though also used for incineration of refuse. Stability +1; +2 bonus to Stability checks against Plague events or Monster Attacks involving undead.
Dance Hall 4 BP 1 month Lumber Village An establishment for dancing, drinking, and consorting with attractive people. It is often a place where members of different social classes can intermingle discreetly, sometimes using masks or other disguises. Economy +1, Loyalty +1; Society +1.
Dump 4 BP 1 month A centralized place to dispose of refuse. Stability +1.
Everflowing Spring 10 BP 1 month A fountain built around several decanters of endless water that provides an inexhaustible supply of fresh water. Fame +1.
Exotic Artisan 10 BP 2 months Lumber Small Town The workshop and home of an exotic craftsman. Subtypes: glassworks, racial goods (select a race not native to this settlement), spices Economy +1, Stability +1; 1 minor ring, wand, or wondrous item.
Fire Station 20 BP 4 months Lumber, Stone Village A building to house firefighting equipment and personnel. Stability +2; Law +1.
Foreign Quarter 30 BP 6 months Lumber, Stone Small City An area with many foreigners, as well as shops and services catering to them. Economy +3, Stability -1; Crime +1, Lore +1, Society +2; increase the value of trade routes (see Trade Edicts) by 5% (maximum 100%).
Foundry 16 BP 4 months Iron, Stone Small City Processes ore and refines it into finished metal. Settlement must be in a hex containing a body of water. Economy +1, Stability +1; Unrest +1; Productivity +1; halves cost of Smithy; increase the Economy and BP earned per turn by 1 for 1 Mine connected to this settlement by a river or Road.
Gambling Den 10 BP 2 months Lumber Small Town A place for games of skill and chance, wagering all manner of stakes. Base value +500 gp; Economy +2, Loyalty +1; Unrest +1; Corruption +1, Crime +1, Society +1; Infamy +1; -1 penalty to Stability checks to resist Drug Den events.
Garrison 28 BP 6 months Stone Large Town A large building to house armies, train guards, and recruit militia. It can house up to 500 units. Upgrade From Barracks. Loyalty +2, Stability +2; Unrest -2; halves cost of City Wall, Granary, Jail.
Granary 12 BP 2 months Lumber Hamlet A place to store grain and food. If Farms reduce Consumption below 0, store up to 5 BP per Granary of excess production for use on a later turn when Consumption exceeds the Treasury. Loyalty +1, Stability +1; Consumption -1.
Graveyard 4 BP 1 month Stone A plot of land to honor and bury the dead. Loyalty +1.
Guildhall 34 BP 6 months Lumber Small Town A large building that serves as headquarters for a guild or similar organization. Subtypes: One per different guild or organization. Base value +1,000 gp; Economy +2, Loyalty +2; Law +1, Productivity +2; halves cost of Pier, Stable, Trade Shop, Warehouse.
Hanging Gardens 48 BP 12 months Lumber Small City A magnificent set of urban gardens, arboretums, and conservatories for the enjoyment of the nobility and common folk alike, containing both decorative and edible plants as well as elaborate public artworks, statuary, and water features. Economy +2, Loyalty +2; Unrest -2; Lore +1, Society +2; Fame +1; halves cost of Menagerie, Monument, Park, Sacred Grove; reduces Consumption in the city by 1; limit 1 per settlement.
Herbalist 10 BP 2 months Lumber Village The workshop and home of a gardener, healer, poisoner, or creator of potions. Loyalty +1, Stability +1; 1 minor potion or wondrous item.
Hospital 30 BP 6 months Stone Large Town A building devoted to healing the sick. Increase Stability by 2 during plague events. Loyalty +1, Stability +2; Lore +1, Productivity +2.
House 3 BP 2 months Lumber A number of mid-sized houses for citizens. Houses serve as prerequisites for many other buildings. Population +50.
Inn 10 BP 2 months Lumber A place for visitors to spend the night. Base value +500 gp; Economy +1, Loyalty +1; Society +1.
Jail 14 BP 2 months Stone A fortified structure for housing criminals. Loyalty +2, Stability +2; Unrest -2; Crime -1, Law +1.
Library 6 BP 2 months Lumber Small Town A large building containing books, often presided over by a sage or other scholar. Upgrade to Academy. Economy +1, Loyalty +1; Lore +1.
Lighthouse 24 BP 4 months Lumber, Stone Small Town; settlement must be in a hex containing a body of water A high tower with a signal light to guide ships at sea and keep watch on waves and weather. Economy +2, Stability +2; cost to create Fisheries in adjacent hexes is reduced by 1 BP; water hexes count as one quarter (rather than half) when calculating Trade Rout Length); limit 1 per settlement.
Lumberyard 12 BP 6 months Lumber Village A mill and carpentry works for producing precut logs, boards, and wood products for construction. Economy +1, Stability +1; Productivity +1; Sawmill cost in settlement's hex or adjacent hexes is reduced by 1 BP, and Sawmills in those hexes generate 1 additional BP for every 2 Sawmills (Sawmills adjacent to two settlements with Lumberyards only benefit from one of them).
Luxury Store 28 BP 4 months Stone Small Town A shop that specializes in expensive wares and luxuries. Subtypes: jeweler, tailor, taxidermist, watchmaker. Upgrade from Shop; Upgrade to Magic Shop. Base value +2,000 gp; Economy +1; 2 minor rings, wands, or wondrous items.
Magic Shop 68 BP 11 months Lumber Small Town A shop that specializes in magic items and spells. Upgrade from Luxury Store. Base value +2,000 gp; Economy +1; 4 minor wondrous items, 2 medium wondrous items, 1 major wondrous item.
Magical Academy 58 BP 10 months Lumber, Stone Small Town An institution for training students in spellcasting, magic item crafting, and various arcane arts. Upgrade from Academy. Economy +2; Lore +2, Society +1; Fame +1; 3 minor potions, scrolls, or wondrous items; 1 medium potion, scroll, or wondrous item; halves cost of Caster's Tower, Library, Magic Shop; increase Lore bonus by 2 for questions relating to Knowledge (arcana).
Magical Streetlamps 5 BP 1 month Aetherite Settlement must have a Cathedral, Magic Shop, Magical Academy, or Temple Continual flame lamps that illuminate the lot. Crime -1; limit 1 per district.
Mansion 10 BP 2 months Stone Small Town A single huge manor housing a rich family and its servants. Upgrade to Noble Villa. Stability +1; Law +1, Society +1.
Market 48 BP 8 months Lumber, Stone Village An open area for mercantile pursuits, traveling merchants, and bargain hunters. Base value +2,000 gp; Economy +2, Stability +2; Productivity +1; 2 minor wondrous items; halves cost of Black Market, Inn, Shop.
Menagerie 16 BP 4 months Iron, Stone Small city A large park stocked with exotic creatures for public viewing. Economy +1, increase Loyalty by 1/4 the CR of the highest-CR creature in the Menagerie; Fame +1.
Military Academy 36 BP 9 months Lumber, Stone Small Town An institution dedicated to the study of war and the training of elite soldiers and officers. Armies and commanders recruited at the settlement gain one bonus tactic (see Army Tactics). Loyalty +2, Stability +1; Law +1, Lore +1; Fame +1; 1 minor armor, shield, or weapon; 1 medium armor, shield, or weapon; halves cost of Barracks; limit 1 per settlement.
Mill 6 BP 2 months Lumber A building used to cut lumber or grind grain. Economy +1, Stability +1; Productivity +1.
Mint 30 BP 5 months Stone Small City A secure building where the kingdom's coinage is minted and standard weights and measures are kept. Economy +3, Loyalty +3, Stability +1; Fame +1.
Moat 2 BP 1 month A fortification of one side of a district with an open or water-filled ditch, often backed by a low dike or embankment. Unrest -1; Defense +1; cannot be damaged by siege engines; limit 1 per district.
Monastery 16 BP 4 months Lumber, Stone A cloister for meditation, study, and the pursuit of various other scholarly paths. Stability +1; Law +1, Lore +1.
Monument 6 BP 1 month Stone A monument can be a statue of a city founder, a bell tower, a large tomb, or a public display of art. Loyalty +1; Unrest -1.
Museum 30 BP 5 months Stone Small City A place to display art and artifacts both modern and historical. The GM may allow the kingdom leaders to display a valuable item (such as a magic item or bejeweled statue) in the museum, increasing Fame during this display by 1 for every 10,000 gp of the item's price (maximum +5 Fame), and by an additional 1 if the item is significant to the kingdom's history. Economy +1, Loyalty +1; Lore +2, Society +1; Fame +1; increase Lore bonus by 2 for questions relating to Knowledge (history); apply Lore bonus on Appraise checks regarding art objects.
Noble Villa 24 BP 4 months Stone Small Town A sprawling manor with luxurious grounds that houses a noble. Upgrade from Mansion. Economy +1, Loyalty +1, Stability +1; Fame +1; halves cost of Exotic Craftsman, Luxury Store, Mansion.
Observatory 6 BP 2 months Stone Small City A dome or tower with optical devices for viewing the heavens. Stability +1; Lore +2; 1 minor scroll or wondrous item.
Orphanage 6 BP 1 month Lumber A place for housing and taking care of large numbers of orphans. Stability +1; Unrest -1.
Palace 108 BP 18 months Lumber, Stone Large City A grand edifice and walled grounds demonstrating one's wealth, power, and authority to the world. You may make two special edicts per turn, but take a -2 penalty on all leadership checks associated with each special edict. Base value +1,000 gp; Economy +2, Loyalty +6, Stability +2; Law +2; Fame +1; halves cost of Mansion, Mint, Noble Villa; limit 1 per settlement.
Park 4 BP 1 month A plot of land set aside for its natural beauty. Loyalty +1; Unrest -1.
Paved Streets 24 BP 6 months Stone Large Town Brick or stone pavement that speeds transportation. Economy +2, Stability +1; Productivity +2; limit 1 per district.
Pier 16 BP 4 months Lumber Village; settlement must be in a hex containing a body of water Warehouses and workshops for docking ships and handling cargo and passengers. Upgrade to Waterfront. Base value +1,000 gp; Economy +1, Stability +1; Crime +1.
Police Station 24 BP 6 months Lumber, Stone Village District headquarters for officers of the law and their equipment with temporary holding cells for suspected criminals. Loyalty +1, Stability +2; Crime -1, Law +1.
Sacred Grove 12 BP 4 months Village; 1 Park A bastion of the old druidic nature religions, often centered on runic megaliths and stone circles. Loyalty +1, Stability +1, Unrest -1; Society -1; 1 minor item; +2 bonus to Stability checks against Crop Failure events or Monster Attacks involving animals, plants, or fey; each Sacred Grove provides a +1 bonus to Stability checks to resist Plague events.
School 12 BP 2 months Lumber Village A place of learning for children and young adults. Economy +1, Loyalty +1; Lore +1, Society +1.
Sewer System 24 BP 3 months Stone Small City An underground sanitation system that keeps the settlement clean, though it may become home to criminals and monsters. Loyalty +1, Stability +2; Crime +1, Productivity +1; halves cost of Cistern, Dump; limit 1 per district.
Shop 8 BP 2 months Lumber 1 House or Mansion A general store. Upgrade to Luxury Store, Market. Base value +500 gp; Economy +1; Productivity +1.
Shrine 8 BP 1 month Stone A small shrine or similar holy site. Upgrade to Temple. Unrest -1; 1 minor potion, scroll, or wondrous item.
Skyport 90 BP 15 months Lumber, Stone Large Town A landing and take-off area for arrival and departure when traveling by air, facilities for building air vehicles, and a center of commerce. Base value +4,000 gp; Economy +4; Productivity +2; 3 minor items, 2 medium items, 1 major item; halves cost of Black Market, Guildhall, Market, Warehouse; halves Loyalty penalty for tax edicts; limit 1 per settlement.
Smithy 6 BP 1 month Iron, Stone Village An armor smith, blacksmith, or weapon smith. Economy +1, Stability +1.
Stable 10 BP 1 month Lumber Village; 1 House, Mansion, or Noble Villa A structure for housing or selling horses and other mounts. It can house up to 50 mounted units. Base value +500 gp; Economy +1, Loyalty +1.
Stockyard 20 BP 4 months Lumber Village Barns and pens that store herd animals and prepare them for nearby slaughterhouses. Farms in this hex or adjacent hexes reduce Consumption by by an additional 1 BP. Economy +1, Stability -1; Productivity +1; halves cost to Stable, Tannery.
Tannery 6 BP 1 month Lumber Hamlet A structure that prepares hides and leather. Economy +1, Stability +1; Society -1.
Tavern 12 BP 2 months Lumber Hamlet; 1 House or Mansion An eatery or drinking establishment. Base value +500 gp; Economy +1, Loyalty +1; Corruption +1.
Temple 32 BP 8 months Stone Small Town A large place of worship dedicated to a deity. Subtypes: Each deity is considered to be a subtype. Upgrade from Shrine. Unrest –2; halves cost of Graveyard, Monument, Shrine; 2 minor items.
Tenement 1 BP 1 month A staggering number of low-rent, cheap housing units. Building too many tenements can increase a kingdom’s Unrest quickly. You can build a house over an existing tenement for 2 BP, eliminating the Unrest modifier, however your population does not increase. Upgrade to House. Counts as House for buildings that must be adjacent to a House. Population +50, Unrest +1.
Theater 24 BP 6 months Lumber Large Town A venue for providing entertainment such as plays, operas, concerts, and the like. Upgrade to Arena. Economy +2, Stability +2; halves cost of Brothel, Park, Tavern.
Town Hall 22 BP 3 months Lumber Hamlet A public venue for town meetings and repository for town records. Economy +1, Loyalty +1, Stability +1; Law +1; halves cost of Barracks, Cistern, Dump, Jail, Watchtower.
Trade Shop 10 BP 2 months Lumber Village; 1 House A shop front for a tradesperson. Subtypes: baker, bookbinder, butcher, candle maker, carpenter, cobbler, furrier, glazier, hatmaker, mason, painter, plumber, rope maker, tailor, undertaker, wainwright. Upgrade to Guildhall. Base value +500 gp; Economy +1, Stability +1; Productivity +1.
Tunnels 8 BP 2 months Small Town An extensive set of subterranean chambers, vaults, and tunnels, usually used for storage or burial, and sometimes for illicit activities. When used for burials, Tunnels are also called Catacombs. Economy +1, Stability +1; Crime +1, Danger +1; limit 1 per district.
University 78 BP 13 months Lumber, Stone Small City An institution of higher learning, focusing mainly on mundane subjects but dabbling in magical theory. Upgrade from Academy. Economy +3, Loyalty +3; Lore +4, Society +3; Fame +1; 4 minor scrolls or wondrous items, 2 medium scrolls or wondrous items; halves cost of Academy, Bardic College, Library, Magical Academy, Military Academy, Museum, School; increase Lore bonus by 4 for questions relating to one Knowledge or Profession skill.
Watchtower 12 BP 2 months Stone Village A tall structure that serves as a guard post and lookout. It can house up to 50 units. Stability +1; Law +1; Unrest -1; Defense +2.
Warehouse 8 BP 2 months Lumber Small Town; settlement must be in a hex containing a body of water or 1 Guildhall, Market, Pier, Trade Shop, or Waterfront A cavernous structure or cluster of buildings for storage and transfer of trade goods. Economy +1; Productivity +1.
Waterfront 90 BP 15 months Lumber, Stone Large Town; settlement must be in a hex containing a body of water A port for arrival and departure when traveling by water, facilities for building ships, and a center of commerce. Upgrade from Pier. Base value +4,000 gp; Economy +4; Productivity +2; 3 minor items, 2 medium items, 1 major item; halves cost of Black Market, Guildhall, Market, Pier, Warehouse; halves Loyalty penalty for tax edicts; limit 1 per settlement.
Windmill 6 BP 1 month Lumber Hamlet A wind-driven mill for grinding grain or pumping water. Economy +1; Productivity +1; increase the Stability bonus of a Cistern or a Granary by 1 up to a limit of 4 Windmills per building.

Events


Listed below are unusual events that can happen during a nation's Event Phase. Most events occur immediately and are instantaneous or terminate at the end of the Event Phase.

Some events impact the whole nation, while others are centered on a specific settlement or hex. Roll on Table: Event Type and Danger Level to determine the type of event and whether it is beneficial or harmful. Then roll on the appropriate beneficial or dangerous settlement or nation event table. If this results in an invalid event (such as a pilgrimage when there are no Cathedrals, Shrines, or Temples in the kingdom), roll again.

Any time an event requires the Ruler to make a check, the Consort or Heir may make the check instead with a -4 penalty.

Continuous Events: A continuous event's effects continue each turn during the Event Phase until you resolve the event (as explained in the event description, usually by succeeding at a Leadership check).

Localized Events: Some events are listed as "settlement" or "hex." The effect of these events are localized to a single settlement or hex. Randomly select a settlement or hex for the location of that event. Some events (such as a feud) could be confined to a settlement or start in one settlement and spread to affect the entire nation, depending on whether they're rolled on one of the Nation Events tables or one of the Settlement Events tables.

Settlement Modifiers: Some events adjust settlement modifiers (Crime, Lore, etc.). If an event is localized to 1 settlement, its settlement modifier adjustments apply only to that settlement; if it's localized to a hex, it affects only settlements in that hex. If the GM is using settlement modifiers for the entire nation and the event is not localized, its adjustments apply to the final modifier for the entire nation. For example, the new subjects event increases Society and Stability for the entire nation by 1.

Hiring Adventurers: Once per Event Phase, you can hire NPC adventurers to help deal with an event, gaining a bonus on one Economy, Loyalty, or Stability check made as part of that event. Adventurers of levels 1–2 grant a +2 bonus on the check and cost 4 BP; adventurers of levels 3–5 grant a +5 bonus on the check and cost 8 BP; adventurers of level 6+ (but never higher than your APL) grant a +10 bonus on the check and cost 16 BP.

Events

Archaeological Find: A well-preserved ruin is found in your nation, with historical artifacts connected to the people who lived in your land long ago. Effect: Lore +1. If you have a Museum, the discoverers donate 10,000 gp worth of historical artifacts to its collection (if you have multiple Museums, choose one as the recipient).

Assassination Attempt: One of your leaders (determined randomly) is the target of an assassination attempt. If the target is a PC, the GM should run the attempt as an encounter, using an assassin of a CR equal to the targeted PC's level. If the target is an NPC, the Spymaster must succeed at a Stability check to prevent the assassination. If the assassination occurs, Unrest increases by 1d6 and the nation immediately incurs the penalties for not having a leader in that role.

Bandit Activity (Continuous): Bandits are preying upon those who travel through your nation. The Marshal must attempt a Stability check. If you succeed, your nation's defenses stop the bandits before they cause any harm. If you fail, the bandits reduce your kingdom's Treasury by 1d6 BP (each time you roll a 6, add the result to the total and roll again), and the event continues in the next Event Phase.

Boomtown (Settlement): Randomly select one settlement. Commerce booms among that settlement. Until the next Event Phase, Economy increases by the number of buildings in the settlement that grant an Economy bonus, and Corruption increases by 1d4 in that settlement.

Building Demand (Settlement, Continuous): The citizens demand a particular building be built (01–75) or demolished (76–100). Select the building type randomly from those available for the settlement. If the demand is not met by the next Event Phase, Unrest increases by 1. Alternatively, you can suppress the citizens' demands and negate the event by having the Ruler succeeding at a Loyalty check, but this reduces Loyalty by 2 and increases Unrest by 1.

Crop Failure (Settlement): Pests, blight, and weather ruin the harvest in the settlement's hex and all adjacent hexes. The Ruler and the Councilor must each attempt a Stability check. If both succeed, the problem is fixed before your nation takes any penalties from the event. If only one succeeds, affected farms reduce Consumption by 1 (instead of the normal reduction) in the next Upkeep Phase. If neither succeeds, affected farms do not reduce Consumption at all in the next Upkeep Phase.

Cult Activity (Settlement, Continuous): A religious cult of an alignment opposed to the kingdom's alignment begins kidnapping, converting, or even publicly sacrificing citizens. The High Priest must attempt a Loyalty check, and the Warden must attempt a Stability check. If both succeed, the cult is disbanded before your nation takes any penalties from the event. For each of these checks you fail, Unrest increases by 1 and Productivity, Society, and Stability decrease by 1. If both checks fail, the event continues in the next Event Phase.

Diplomatic Overture: A nearby nation sends an ambassador to you to negotiate an embassy (01–60), treaty (61–90), or alliance (91–100), as if using a diplomatic edict (see Special Edicts). If the GM doesn't have an appropriate nation in mind when this event occurs, determine the nation's alignment randomly; it may be hostile or friendly. The ambassador bears 1d4 BP worth of gifts for your nation.

Discovery (Settlement): Scholars unearth a bit of ancient lore or devise important new research of their own. Fame increases by 1 and Lore increases by 1d4.

Drug Den (Settlement, Continuous): One of your Houses or Tenements becomes a hive of illicit drug trade. The Enforcer must attempt a Loyalty check, and the Warden must attempt a Stability check, each with a penalty equal to the number of Brothels, Tenements, Waterfronts, and lots with squatters in the settlement. If you succeed at both checks, you eliminate the drug den before your nation takes any penalties from the event. If you fail at one check, Crime and Unrest increase by 1. If you fail at both checks, Crime and Unrest increase by 1; Economy, Loyalty, and Stability decrease by 1; and on the next Event Phase, a second drug den event occurs in the same settlement (01–50) or the nearest settlement (51–100).

Economic Boom: Trade is booming in your nation! Your Treasury increases by 1d6 BP (each time you roll a 6, add the result to the total and roll again).

Entertainers’ Troupe: A traveling circus or entertainers’ troupe from a neighboring nation visits your realm. You gain 1d4 BP and a +4 bonus on Stability checks until your next Event phase. Reduce your Unrest by 2.

Festive Invitation: Your nation's leaders are invited to a festival in a neighboring nation. If you attend and bring 1d4 BP worth of gifts, for 1 year Society increases by 1, Fame increases by 1 for any check relating to that nation, and you gain a +2 bonus on edict checks relating to that nation.

Feud (Settlement, Continuous): Nobles (or other influential rival groups) are bickering. The Ruler or Councilor must attempt a Loyalty check. If you succeed, you end the event but Unrest increases by 1. If you fail, Corruption increases by 1, Unrest increases by 1d6, and the event is continuous.

Food Shortage: Spoilage, treachery, or bad luck has caused a food shortage this turn. The Ruler must attempt a Stability check. If you succeed, Consumption in the next Upkeep Phase increases by 50%. If you fail, Consumption in the next Upkeep Phase increases by 100%.

Food Surplus: Farmers produce an unexpected windfall! In the next Upkeep Phase, the nation's Consumption is halved (but returns to normal on the next turn).

Foreign Spy: A spy from a foreign nation is discovered trying to find out the nation’s weaknesses. The Spymaster must attempt a Stability check. If you succeed, you halt the spy in the middle of their plans, and Unrest increases by 1. If you fail, the spy completes his objective and escapes, and Unrest increases by 1d4+1.

Good Weather: Good weather raises spirits and productivity. Economy, Loyalty, and Productivity increase by 2 until the next Event Phase.

Improvement Demand (hex): This event is identical to the building demand event, but the citizens want the construction or destruction of a terrain improvement in the hex.

Inquisition (settlement, continuous): Zealots mobilize public opinion against a particular race, religion, kingdom, behavior, or kingdom leader. The Ruler or High Priest must attempt a Loyalty check. If you fail, the zealots run rampant; Infamy and Law increase by 1 and Lore, Loyalty, Productivity, and Stability decrease by 2. If you succeed, the zealots are somewhat suppressed; Lore, Loyalty, Productivity, and Stability decrease by 1. Two successful checks in a row end the event (if a check ends the event, no penalties from it occur that turn).

Justice Prevails (settlement): Authorities shut down a major criminal operation or thwart a plot against the settlement. Law and Loyalty increase by 1 and Crime and Unrest decreases by 1.

Land Rush: Overeager settlers claim an unclaimed hex and construct a Farm, Mine, Quarry, or Sawmill at their own expense, but are fighting over ownership. This hex is not part of your nation, so you gain no benefits from it. Productivity, Society, and Stability decrease by 1. The Ruler or Marshal must attempt a Loyalty check. If you succeed, Unrest increases by 1. If you fail, Unrest increases by 1d4. If you construct an identical improvement in an adjacent hex during your next Edict Phase, remove this event's changes to Productivity, Society, and Stability.

Large Disaster (Hex): A fire, storm, earthquake, flood, massive sabotage, or other disaster strikes! Roll 1d6; on a result of 1–5, the disaster threatens only 1 improved hex. On a result of 6, the disaster is widespread and threatens 1d6 additional improved hexes adjacent to the target hex. The Marshal must attempt a Stability check for each threatened hex; failure means the disaster destroys one terrain improvement in the hex and Unrest increases by 1. (This Stability check represents your nation's ability to prepare for or react to the disaster as well as the structure's ability to withstand damage.)

Localized Disaster (Settlement): A fire, a flood, a storm, an earthquake, massive sabotage, or another disaster strikes the settlement! Roll 1d6 to determine how many buildings are threatened by the disaster. On a result of 6, the disaster is widespread and affects 1d6 additional buildings. The Warden must attempt a Stability check for each threatened lot; failure means the disaster destroys the building in that lot and Unrest increases by 1. (This Stability check represents your nation's ability to prepare for or react to the disaster as well as the structure's ability to withstand damage.)

Mercantile Contacts: The Magister or the Treasurer can attempt to use merchant contacts to find a specific magic item, making an Economy check for each item. If successful, a merchant finds the items and delivers them at the beginning of the next build phase. These items are available for purchase at the market price and are only available until the end of the month. Artifacts are not available through mercantile contacts.
Kingdom Size Minor Magic Items Medium Magic Items Major Magic Items
1-10 1
11-25 2
26-50 3 1
51-100 4 2
101-200 5 3 1
(+100) (+1) (+1) (+1)

Monster Attack (Settlement, Continuous): A monster (or group of monsters) attacks the nation. The GM picks a claimed hex in the nation in which the monster is active. The CR of the monster encounter is equal to the party's APL + 1d4 – 1. You can personally deal with the monster (earning XP and treasure normally for your efforts) or the Marshal must succeed at a Stability check to eliminate it (which doesn't affect you or the nation's statistics). If the monster is not defeated this turn, Unrest increases by 4. If the monster is not defeated on the next turn, the monster's hex becomes unclaimed—this is in addition to losing control of hexes in the Upkeep Phase because of the nation's high Unrest score.

Natural Blessing: A natural event, such as a bloom of rare and beautiful wildflowers or a good omen in the stars, raises your kingdom's morale. You gain a +4 bonus on Stability checks until the next Event Phase.

New Subjects: A small group of indigenous intelligent creatures joins your nation and submits to your rule. Society and Stability increase by 1, Unrest decreases by 1, and your Treasury increases by 1d6 BP (each time you roll a 6, add the result to the total and roll again).

Noblesse Oblige (Settlement): A noble family offers to construct a Monument (01–50) or Park (51–100) in your settlement at the family's own expense. The nobles pay all costs and Consumption for this purpose.

Outstanding Success (Settlement): One of your nation's citizens creates an artistic masterpiece, constructs a particularly impressive building, or otherwise brings glory to your nation. Fame increases by 1, your Treasury increases by 1d6 BP, and Unrest decreases by 2. You gain a +4 bonus on Economy checks until the next Event Phase.

Pilgrimage (settlement): Randomly select one settlement with a Cathedral, Shrine, or Temple. Pious religious folk journey to your settlement, holding a religious festival in that settlement at no BP cost to you.

Plague (Hex or Settlement, Continuous): A deadly sickness strikes the target hex or settlement. You cannot construct terrain improvements or buildings there while plague persists. The High Priest and the Magister must each make a Stability check, each with a penalty equal to the number of Brothels, Foreign Quarters, Highways, Inns, Piers, Roads, Stables, Stockyards, Tenements, and Waterfronts in the hex, and a bonus equal to the number of Alchemists, Cathedrals, Herbalists, Hospitals, and Temples in the hex. If you succeed at both checks, the event ends, but Stability decreases by 2 and Treasury by 1d3 BP. If you fail at one check, Stability decreases by 4, Treasury decreases by 1d6 BP, and Unrest increases by 1d3. If you fail at both, Stability decreases by 4, Treasury decreases by 1d6 BP, Unrest increases by 1d6, and in the next Event Phase the plague spreads to an adjacent hex.

Political Calm: A sudden absence of political machinations coincides with an increase in public approval. Unrest decreases by 1d6. Until the next Event Phase, you gain a +2 bonus on checks to resolve continuous events. If your nation has no Unrest and no continuous events, both Loyalty and Stability increase by 1. Law increases by 1 for the entire nation.

Public Scandal: One of your leaders is implicated in a crime or an embarrassing situation, such as an affair with another leader's spouse. Infamy increases by 1. The Councilor must attempt a Loyalty check. If you fail, Unrest increases by 2 and you take a –4 penalty on all Loyalty checks until the next Event Phase.

Remarkable Treasure (Settlement): The settlement immediately fills one of its open magic item slots (selected randomly) with a better than normal item (medium if a minor slot, major if a medium slot). Treat the settlement's base value as 50% higher than normal for determining the item's maximum price. If the settlement doesn't have any open magic item slots, treat this event as Unexpected Find.

Sensational Crime (Settlement, Continuous): A serial killer, arsonist, or daring bandit plagues your kingdom. The Marshal and the Warden must each attempt a Stability check, adding the settlement's Law and subtracting its Crime. If you succeed at both checks, the criminal is caught before your nation takes any penalties from the event. If you fail at one, the criminal escapes, Unrest increases by 1, and the event is continuous. If you fail at both, the criminal makes a fool of the authorities; Law and Loyalty decrease by 1, Treasury decreases by 1d4 BP, Unrest increases by 2, and the event is continuous.

Slavers (Settlement, Continuous): Criminals begin kidnapping citizens and selling them into slavery. The Spymaster must attempt a Loyalty check, and the Warden must attempt a Stability check, each with a penalty equal to the number of Brothels, Tenements, Waterfronts, and lots with squatters in the settlement. If both checks succeeds, the slavers are caught before your kingdom takes any penalties from the event. If you fail at one of the checks, Loyalty, Stability, and Unrest decrease by 1, but the event is not continuous. If you fail at both checks, Loyalty, Stability, and Unrest decrease by 2, and the event is continuous.

Smugglers (Continuous): Unscrupulous merchants are subverting legitimate businesses. The Treasurer must attempt a Loyalty check, and the Warden must attempt a Stability check, each with a penalty equal to the number of Piers, Waterfronts, and trade routes in the kingdom. If both checks succeed, the smugglers are stopped before your kingdom takes any penalties from the event. If you fail at one of the checks, Corruption increases by 1d2 in each settlement, Crime increases by 1 for the nation, Productivity for the nation decreases by 1d3, Treasury decreases by 1d3 BP, and the event is not continuous. If you fail at both of the checks, Corruption increases by 1d4, Crime for the nation increases by 1, Productivity for the nation decreases by 1d6, Treasury decreases by 1d6 BP, and the event is continuous.

Squatters (Settlement, Continuous): An empty settlement lot is taken over by beggars, troublemakers, and people unable to find adequate work or housing; they camp there with tents, wagons, and shanties. The cost to construct buildings in the settlement increase by 50% of the base price. Fame and Stability decrease by 1, and Unrest increases by 2. The Warden may try to disperse the squatters with a Stability check. Success means the squatters are dispersed and the event is not continuous, but if a House or Tenement is not built in that lot on the next turn, Infamy increases by 1 and Unrest by 2. Failing the Stability check means the event is continuous.

Unexpected Find (Settlement): Local citizens discover a forgotten magical item. The settlement gains one temporary minor (01–70) or medium (71–100) magic item slot that is automatically filled in the next Upkeep Phase. This slot and the item go away if the item is purchased or in the next Event Phase, whichever comes first.

Vandals (Settlement): Thugs and dissidents riot and destroy property. The Enforcer must attempt a Loyalty check, and the Warden must attempt a Stability check. If both succeed, the vandals are stopped before your nation takes any penalties. If you fail at one check, Society decreases by 1 and one random building in the settlement is damaged. If you fail at both, one random building is destroyed (Unrest increases by 1 for each lot of the destroyed building), and 1d3 other random buildings are damaged. a damaged building provides no benefits until half its cost is spent repairing it.

Visiting Celebrity (Settlement): A celebrity from another kingdom visits one of your settlements, causing a sudden influx of other visitors and spending. Fame increases by 1 and Treasury increases by 1d6 BP (each time you roll a 6, add the result to the total and roll again).

Visiting Diplomats: Diplomats from neighboring nations arrive to participate in a fete held in their honor. If the nation size is between 3 and 25 hexes, the nation rulers can invite one diplomat; between 26 and 50 hexes, two diplomats; 51 and 100 three diplomats; and over 100 hexes, an additional diplomat for every 100 hexes. Whether or not the diplomats show up depends on the relationships between the nations (the GM is encouraged to roleplay this out). You gain a +2 bonus on Economy checks for every diplomat that shows up to the fete until your next event phase.

Wealthy Immigrant (Settlement): A rich merchant or a noble from another land is impressed with your nation and asks to construct a Mansion (01–75) or Noble Villa (76–100) in the settlement at no cost to you. If you allow it, the building provides its normal benefits to your nation.

Deities and Holy Sites


Cathedrals, Shrines, and Temples bring additional bonuses on top of those normally listed. These bonuses depend on the deity the religious building is devoted to. Temples include deity bonuses from Shrines, and Cathedrals include the deity bonuses from both Shrines and Temples. In addition, the numerical modifiers of the Shrine is doubled for a Temple, and tripled for a Cathedral.

Deity Shrine Temple Cathedral
Asmodeus Stability +1; Corruption +1, Law +1. Halves cost of Bureau. Halves cost of Assembly.
Belthazar Economy +1; Productivity +1. Halves cost of Smithy. Halves cost of Foundry.
Cylene Stability +1; Law +1. Halves cost of Jail. Advantage on Warden leadership checks made in this settlement.
Danika Stability +1; Crime +1. Halves cost of Herbalist Advantage on Enforcer leadership checks made in this settlement.
Deianeira Loyalty +1; Society +1. Halves cost of Advantage on Marshal leadership checks for scout teams based in this settlement.
El-Sathys Economy +1; Lore +2; one additional minor item. Halves cost of Caster's Tower and Library; one additional medium item. Halves cost of Magical Academy and University; one additional major item.
Firhanna Loyalty +1; Productivity -1, Society +1; halves cost of Cistern. Halves cost of Sacred Grove Halves cost of Hanging Garden, Menagerie.
Gunther Loyalty +1; Society +1. Halves cost of Inn. Halves cost of Roads and Highways in settlement's hex and adjacent hexes.
Kaï-den Loyalty +1, Stability +1; Law +1, Society +1. Halves cost of Courthouse. Halves cost of Hospital.
Heiranis Loyalty +2; Law -1, Society +1.
Jeshakhet Stability +1; Law +1, Lore +1. Halves cost of Crematorium.
Kimylia Economy +1; Productivity +1. halves cost of Bank. Halves cost of Guildhall and Market.
Karthamor Stability +1; Productivity +1; Defense +5. Halves cost of Barrack. Halves cost of Arena and Military Academy.
Lucial Loyalty +1; Lore +1. Halves cost of Theater. Halves cost of Bardic College
Minué Loyalty +1; Lore +1, Society +1. Halves cost of Observatory.
Noué Economy +2; Corruption +1, Crime +1, Lore +1. One additional minor item. One additional medium item.
Orcus Economy +2; Crime +1, Society -1; Danger +5.
Phaenya Loyalty +1; Society +1. Halves cost of Dance Hall. Halves cost of Gambling Den.
Seshalis Stability +1; Productivity +1. Halves cost of Pier. Halves cost of Waterfront.
Sevrash Loyalty +2; Society -1; Danger +5. Halves cost of Menagerie.
Shenlong Loyalty +1; Law +1. Halves cost of Aerie.
Shyzan Stability +1; Law +1. Halves cost of Monastery
Sindall Economy +2; Corruption +1, Crime +1. Halves cost of Black Market.
St. Argath Loyalty +1; Society +1. Halves cost of Orphanage. Halves cost of Hospital.
St. Radimus Law +1, Productivity +1, Society -1. Halves cost of Manor and Noble Villa. Halves cost of Palace.
Thraxis Economy +2; Corruption +1, Society -1; Danger +5. Halves cost of Sewer System.
Tiamat Economy +2; Society -1; Danger +5.
Tierra Loyalty +1; Corruption -1, Society +1. Halves of Granary. Farms in settlement's hex and adjacent hexes reduce Consumption cost by an additional 1 (Farms adjacent to two settlements with Cathedrals of Tierra benefit from only one of the Cathedrals).
Vandarion Stability +1; Defense +5. Halves cost of Watchtower. Halves cost of Military Academy.
Xarios Economy +2; Corruption +1, Lore +1; Danger +5. Halves cost of Magic Shop.
Zhao-Khan Economy +1, Stability +1; Corruption +1, Law +1, Society -1. Halves cost of Military Academy.

Fame and Infamy


Size Increases: When your nation's Size increases to 11, 26, 51, 101, and every 100 hexes afterwards, Fame or Infamy (Ruler's choice) increases by 1.

Natural Advantages


Not every city is built on flat, level ground. Historically speaking, most city sites were chosen because of some form of advantageous terrain which made the area especially fertile or defensible. Once a hex has been explored, you or your surveyors can spend a day multiplied by the hex's terrain cost multiplier (see Table: Terrain and Terrain Improvements), they can seek out natural advantages for defense, trade, or simply abundant production. After this extended exploration, the explorers must make a Knowledge (geography) check, dividing the result by 20 (rounding down). The result is the number of natural advantages they discover at within the hex. Roll a 1d20 on the Table: Natural Advantages to determine which advantage is discovered.
    If the check result is sufficiently high to provide more than one natural advantage, you may roll again on the table for each additional advantage. If your roll selects the same advantage more than once, the effects stack.
    Another search for natural advantages can be done multiple times in the same hex on a later date, however the results do not stack. Instead, if the Knowledge (geography) check result is high enough to discover more advantages than the previous check, then you discover the same advantages as last time, plus the newly discovered advantages numbering the difference from the last roll.
    If ever your result for natural advantages is "None", then you have exhausted your search of the hex, and have confirmed that there are no other natural advantages. You can no longer make Knowledge (geography) checks in this hex to search for natural advantages.

Table: Natural Advantages
d20 Natural Advantage Benefits
1-4 None There are no remaining natural advantages in the hex. Re-roll if there are no natural advantages yet discovered.
5-8 Abundant Water Halves the cost of an Aqueduct and a Canal in this hex. Hex counts as a body of water.
9-12 Fertile Lands A Farm in this hex reduces Consumption by an additional 1 BP.
13-16 Natural Crossroads Economy +1 if an Inn is built in this hex.
17-20 Natural Defenses Defense +1 for a settlement or improvement built in this hex.
Natural Paths Halves the cost of a Road in this hex.
Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License